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24 hour light for seedlings

will a 24 hour light cycle stress plants?

budsmoker87
New Member

for the first time, I’m starting indoors this season (and going outdoors for a guerilla grow later)

anyway, i’ve heard conflicting views on this, so i was curious if anybody had personal experience.

are plants more likely to herm later in life if they’re under 24 hours of light during seedling/partial veg?

I’d imagine there are some variances- depending on the strain’s native geographic location. i’m using bagseed though, so I can’t provide any info there

Any feedback is appreciated tho

(plants are under 4-foot, 40-watt full-spectrum fluoro grow lights, 2700 lumens)

SCARHOLE
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BongKong420
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SmokesLikeBob
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delstele
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estesj
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madodah
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Space Angel
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madodah
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You can start seeds under 24 hour light but you absolutely have to put them in their home outside before they reach sexual maturity.

If you allow them to preflower inside ( 1-1/2 – 2 months old) and then put them outside, you are risking early spring flowering / revegging plants.

See if you had clones under 24 hour light and put them outside, even on the longest day of the year, they will start to flower. Because they are mature, and a large photo-period shock sends the hormones of the plants into flower mode.

An Immature seedling plant will not have proper hormone level to start flowering. But a mature 2 month old vegging plant that shows preflowers does. and so do clones.

Space Angel
Well-Known Member
madodah
Well-Known Member

You can start seeds under 24 hour light but you absolutely have to put them in their home outside before they reach sexual maturity.

If you allow them to preflower inside ( 1-1/2 – 2 months old) and then put them outside, you are risking early spring flowering / revegging plants.

See if you had clones under 24 hour light and put them outside, even on the longest day of the year, they will start to flower. Because they are mature, and a large photo-period shock sends the hormones of the plants into flower mode.

An Immature seedling plant will not have proper hormone level to start flowering. But a mature 2 month old vegging plant that shows preflowers does. and so do clones.

Space Angel
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madodah
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PBFseedco.
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DubsFan
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I have seen some plants flower when going from 24/0 to 18/6. It doesn’t take 12/12 to make a plant flower. I don’t think it’s ever really 12/12 outdoors. Anything close will make them flower.

I have a group of 24/0 friends a group of 18/6 friends. The opinion of the 18/6 crowd is that you will get more growth with 18/6 because everything living does need rest at some point. They also feel that their plants grow during the dark period. More dark is more growth. Like when you flip them to 12/12 indoors, suddenly you get a massive stretch even though you are only at 12 hours of light. it’s the 12 hours of dark where they grow.

Just their opinions.

I’ve done both and can’t really tell any difference.

A cloner I know runs 24/0 solely to avoid powdery mildew. In SoCal PM can happen anywhere any time.

for the first time, I'm starting indoors this season (and going outdoors for a guerilla grow later) anyway, i've heard conflicting views on this, so i was…

Is a 24-Hour Light Schedule Bad for Plants?

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When growing plants indoors, it becomes your job to provide all of the things Mother Nature would in the plant’s natural habitat. Light is one of the most important things you must provide and like other needs, requirements vary from one plant species to another. Many plants do well under 24-hour artificial lighting, but there are a handful that will refuse to bloom and perform their best under these circumstances. Others will thrive and bloom faster than usual when continuously exposed to light.

The Dark Side of Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis involves two biochemical processes, known as light reaction and dark reaction. During light reaction, the plant absorbs light and turns it into energy. This energy is in an unstable form, however, and cannot be stored for later use. To solve this problem, the plant’s dark reaction converts these energy compounds into carbohydrates, which can be stored and accessed later. As the name implies, light reactions do need sunlight or artificial light to occur. Dark reactions, however, can happen at any time and often occur while the plant is exposed to light. Because dark reactions do not require the absence of light, plants will remain healthy when exposed to light 24 hours a day. There are some plants, however, that will survive but not thrive without darkness.

Plants That Crave Darkness

Some plants are photosensitive and need a certain amount of darkness in order to bloom. Winter-blooming plants, such as poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherima), bloom in response to the season’s shorter days. When grown outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, poinsettias automatically receive less light as days grow shorter. Indoors, these plants need you to regulate the light for them. Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana) and Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera truncata), both perennial in USDA zones 10 through 12, are also photosensitive and won’t bloom when continuously exposed to light. Spider plants (Chlorophytum spp.), perennial in USDA zones 9 through 11, do best with 12 hours of light a day rather than 24.

Loving the Light

While some plants need a certain amount of darkness to bloom, others crave light. Exposure to 24-hour light helps some plants like orchids (Orchidaceae spp.) and cacti (Cactaceae spp.) bloom more quickly than they normally would if grown outdoors. Orchid varieties, depending on species, grow outdoors in USDA zones 1 through 11 while cacti, also depending on species, are perennial in USDA zones 5 through 13. Many houseplants and bedding plants also do well in 24-hour lighting, including coleus (Coleus hybridus), Swiss cheese plant (Monstera deliciosa) and dieffenbachia (Dieffenbachia spp.). The Swiss cheese plant and dieffenbachia both are perennials in USDA zones 10 through 12, while coleus is grown indoors or as an annual.

A Word on Intensity

When experimenting with or altering the amount of light your indoor plants receive, remember that the intensity of the light can be as important as the amount. Some plants require bright, intense light while others require low or indirect light. A plant that looks dull and has smaller leaves than it should is not getting enough light. Try increasing the intensity of the light the plant receives or start providing light 24 hours a day. Plants that receive too much light turn yellow in color and may eventually be covered in patches of dead, burnt tissue. Help these plants by moving the light source further away, reducing the intensity of the light they receive, or by providing longer periods of darkness.

Is a 24-Hour Light Schedule Bad for Plants?. When growing plants indoors, it becomes your job to provide all of the things Mother Nature would in the plant’s natural habitat. Light is one of the most important things you must provide and like other needs, requirements vary from one plant species to another. Many …