Can You Drive After Taking CBD Gummy

CBDISTILLERY

Buy CBD Oil Online

Author: Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research A lot of questions we’ve noticed appearing more frequently online are focussed on CBD oil and driving. Here’s everything you need to know.

Alcohol & Other Drugs

Cannabis is commonly used in Canada. According to a recent survey, 17.% of Canadians reported using cannabis at least once in the past three months. Around 6% said they used cannabis “daily or almost daily.”

Driving after using cannabis is relatively common in Canada. Fifteen percent of cannabis users with a driver’s license reported driving within two hours of use at least once in the last year. (It’s safest to wait at least six hours before driving.) Two recent studies in BC revealed that around 8 of drivers who sustained injuries in car crashed tested positive for cannabis, among other substances.

What’s the problem with driving after using cannabis?

Cannabis contains THC (the short name for the mind-altering chemical in cannabis). THC can impair our ability to drive. When THC is in our blood, it may affect our tracking ability, reaction time, sight, concentration and memory. THC can also compromise our ability to handle unexpected events, such as a child stepping out onto the street.

(Note: You may have heard about CBD, the short name for a therapeutic compound found in cannabis. CBD is not hours before driving after using cannabis.mind-altering and does not affect driving.)

The way THC affects us depends on many factors, including the strain of cannabis and our experience with the substance. Evidence suggests regular users of THC may be more tolerant of its impairment effects. But this doesn’t mean it’s OK to drive if you’re a regular cannabis user. Cannabis can impair many aspects of functioning that affect safe driving, even in regular users.

Evidence shows cannabis use increases our risk of being in a vehicle crash. What’s more, using cannabis in combination with alcohol puts us at significantly higher risk of harm. THC can magnify the effects of alcohol. In 2014, nearly one in five fatally injured drivers tested positive for THC, among other substances.

Why do people take the risk?

For some people, the benefits of cannabis seem to outweigh the risk, including risks related to driving. For example, there are people with medical issues who may be using cannabis (THC and CBD) throughout the day to function and participate in life as a “regular person.” Others may be using it to cope with the stress, routine, or boredom of their job or occupation.

“I’m a very anxious type of person. I used cannabis just to be able to relax while working. It kept me awake and, believe it or not, helped me focus better. I knew there were risks, like losing my Class 1 licence. But the benefits outweighed the risks 100%”—retired truck driver and heavy equipment operator

Other reasons people risk driving after using cannabis may involve their beliefs about drug use. For example, some people think cannabis is not very intoxicating and therefore not much of an obstacle to driving. Yet cannabis can be a depressant, which means it slows down activity in our central nervous system. This can equate to slower brain function, poor concentration and confusion.

Some cannabis users who drive may understand the impairment effects of cannabis and avoid getting behind the wheel within the first hour after using it. However, other users—younger male drivers in particular—may be at increased risk of what most would consider to be “reckless driving.” It is always safest to wait six hours before driving after using cannabis.

See also  CBD Massage Oil

What happens if you’re caught using cannabis and driving?

The police use a range of tools to come to a conclusion about a person’s ability to drive. The smell of the drug on the driver or in the vehicle, red eyes and dilated pupils, and lapses of attention and concentration may suggest impairment. These clues give the police permission to ask drivers to perform three road-side tests: horizontal gaze nystagmus (involuntary jerking of the eyes when moved to the side), a one-leg stand, and a walk and turn. Drivers may also be asked to provide a sample of oral fluid. Some officers receive special training on detecting cannabis impairment and may issue a roadside suspension based on their judgement alone.

Yet, cannabis impairment testing is inherently tricky. THC can still register in a person’s body a long time after they’ve used the drug. This means a driver can test positive for THC even when well below intoxication or impairment level. Furthermore, it is not clear what blood THC levels actually indicate impairment and this seems to vary depending on the mode of ingestion.

If a driver is deemed impaired, they may be subject to fines, license suspensions, and other penalties, including increased insurance costs. See RCMP site for more details.

There are personal and social costs too. Losing your license can affect your self-esteem and confidence, your reputation among family and friends, and your job (if your job involves driving or you need to drive to get to work). And an impaired driving charge can stay on your driving record for a long time.

Things to consider

Think of your well-being and that of others. What message are you sending to others if you are willing to take risks such as driving when impaired or riding with someone who may be impaired?

Check your beliefs. How do they match up with those of other people you know? What are they based on? Being honest about your own experience and giving real consideration to other opinions can help you make good decisions. Doing a little research, from credible sources, may also help you become better informed about the properties and effects of cannabis.

Make changes, if you want to. It can be refreshing to reflect on our behaviour, including drug use, and think about small things we might want to do to increase our health and well-being. For example, we could try taking a walk after work before or instead of unwinding with cannabis or other substances.

Safer cannabis use

Some people will choose to use cannabis, regardless of rules or regulations. For those considering using cannabis, here are some things to think about and ways to reduce harm.

Before you use cannabis, ask yourself.

Do I really want to use it? Sometimes cannabis helps. Sometimes it makes things worse.

Can I trust my source? Legal cannabis sources are tested for quality while street cannabis is not.

How much THC is in it? THC or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol is the most well-known cannabinoid that causes impairment. Too much THC can also cause other unwanted effects (e.g., psychosis, paranoia).

See also  CBD Essential Oil Recipe

How much CBD is in it? Cannabidiol or CBD is another cannabinoid. Unlike THC, CBD does not cause impairment. There is some evidence that CBD may block or lower some of the effects of THC and may contribute to the health benefits associated with cannabis use.

It’s safer to.

Avoid using too much too often, especially if you’re young. Human brains are not fully developed until early adulthood. Regular use (daily or almost daily) over time can lead to dependence. You may start needing it just to feel normal.

Wait at least six hours before driving or operating machinery.

Avoid smoking. Vaping or edibles are better options because they are not as harmful to your lungs. If you do smoke, don’t hold in the smoke. 95% of the THC is absorbed immediately.

Go slowly when eating or drinking cannabis. You can get higher than expected. Try a little and wait an hour before using more. Same advice when trying a new type of cannabis—go slowly.

Avoid mixing substances. Adding tobacco to a joint means adding another drug along with cancer-causing toxins. Drinking alcohol while using cannabis intensifies the effects, including impairment, and makes them last longer than expected.

Skip cannabis if you (or a member of your family) have a history of psychosis or a substance use disorder. Cannabis use increases risk that symptoms of these conditions will reappear or get worse. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s safest to avoid using cannabis.

CBD Oil And Driving: Is It Safe?

With the US CBD market expected to reach $24.4 billion by 2024, the number of CBD oil users is likely to continue to grow over the next few years.

With more people becoming aware of the potential benefits CBD oil might offer, there seems to be more and more questions being asked by potential users who are curious as to whether it might be beneficial for them.

One question we’ve noticed appearing more frequently online is whether or not you can drive after using CBD oil.

Here’s everything you need to know.

What Is CBD Oil?

Derived from cannabis, Cannabidiol, or CBD as it’s more commonly known, is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compounds found in the plant.

CBD interacts with the body’s endocannabinoid system, a recently discovered network of receptors and transmitters that are found in the brain and the body’s nervous systems, and help to regulate a number of the body’s functions.

As CBD doesn’t form a natural part of our diets, using CBD oil works in the same way as taking a multivitamin, making sure your body has all of the elements it needs to function at its optimum level.

Can You Drive After Taking CBD Oil?

Because CBD is a compound from the cannabis plant, there is still a large number of people who think that driving after taking CBD oil would be the same as driving while under the influence.

However, the high commonly associated with cannabis use is caused by Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, a psychoactive compound found in the cannabis plant.

CBD, on the other hand, is non-psychoactive, so provided your CBD oil meets the legal requirement of containing less than 1mg of THC then yes, it is safe to drive after taking CBD oil.

See also  Does CBD Oil Help With Torn Ligaments

Will CBD Oil Impair My Driving?

One concern users might have about using CBD oil before getting behind the wheel is whether or not it will impair their ability to drive.

We’re probably all aware that driving under the influence of Cannabis is illegal, but the ingredient within Cannabis that causes impairment is THC.

Unlike THC, CBD is a non-psychoactive compound, meaning it should have no effect on the users cognitive functions, and will not, therefore, impair their ability to drive.

What Are The Side Effects Of CBD Oil?

While CBD is safe, and is generally well tolerated by people, there have been instances of side effects reported with CBD use.

While side effects are typically rare, and very mild if they do occur, it’s important that users are mindful of how their body reacts to taking CBD in the same way they would be with any other food supplement, and should stop taking if they believe it’s having an adverse effect.

One side effect that can be caused by taking a high dose of CBD oil, or by taking too much too quickly, is drowsiness. This could obviously be dangerous when driving a vehicle, so again it’s important to be aware of how you are personally reacting to the doses you’re taking, adjusting them accordingly if you do start to experience drowsiness.

Is CBD Oil Legal?

The short answer is yes – all of our CBD products are legal in the UK.

There are still, however, many companies who are more interested in profits than high quality products, so we urge users to be careful about where they’re buying CBD oil from.

Legal issues can arise if the product you’ve purchased isn’t high quality, and it contains an illegal quantity of THC.

Police can instruct drivers to perform a field impairment assessment if they believe a driver is under the influence of a controlled substance such as THC, so make sure that the product you’re using in line with the UK’s guidelines of containing less than 1mg of THC and it’s unlikely there will be any issues.

In general, if a company is making claims about their products that seem too good to be true, it probably is.

Companies making claims about medical or health benefits of their products should also set alarm bells ringing. There are no approved health claims for any CBD supplements in Europe, so anyone doing so is selling unlawfully.

The Bottom Line

When it comes to CBD oil and driving, the bottom line is that it’s perfectly legal, and safe, to drive after you’ve taken CBD oil, provided you’ve purchased from a reliable source.

As with any form of supplement, users should take note of how they react when they start supplementing their diet, and should be mindful of any potential side effects that start to emerge.

If you’re unsure about which product would be best for you, we’ve created the “CBD First Time Buyers Guide” to help answer your most pressing questions about CBD.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 4 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.