Cannabis Seed Sprouted But Stopped Growing

Have you experienced cannabis seed germination issues and wondered what is the most reliable seed germination method? Read on for expert tips and advice. Hello peeps, okay a few weeks ago i bought 5 big buddha seeds (bubble cheese). i soaked them for a few days, fine. I then put them into the paper towel… Common Seedling Problems & Mistakes Before we take a look at cannabis seedling problems and common beginner mistakes, let’s show you what healthy cannabis seedlings and young plants look like! If

Top 10 germination and seedling mistakes

Most seed germination issues can be sourced back to the germination method. This is an area where Dutch Passion have extensive expertise and can offer accurate, professional advice for seed germination issues.

Dutch Passion have been helping growers with their cannabis seed requirements since the 1980’s. Few in the seed business can claim more experience. Many of the early problems that growers deal with involve issues with germination of the cannabis seeds and subsequent growth of the seedlings.

Below are the 10 cannabis seed germination topics which generate the most feedback and questions from growers. Hopefully you will learn something which can improve the success of your future grows.

1. Watering too much, or too little… or both!

Perhaps the most common seed germination issues are related to the amount of water (and the germination technique) used to produce seed germination. A lot of cannabis seed germination issues are caused when the seeds are overwatered and soaked. Soaking seeds, or giving them an environment with too much water, causes seeds to stagnate and stop developing.

Soaking cannabis seeds causes them to stagnate.

When a cannabis seed germinates, a small white root will emerge. However, if the cannabis seed is soaked for too long in waterlogged conditions the root will stop growing and eventually start to rot. An indication of root rot is a brown colouration on the root or the root tip. Cannabis roots need oxygen as well as moisture to thrive. But if the roots are soaked for too long, there is insufficient oxygen for root health to be maintained and root rot can begin.

Conversely, seed germination issues are also seen when the cannabis seed dries out due to insufficient moisture. This can happen when growers try to germinate their seeds between moist cotton pads but forget to put them in a sealed container e.g a dinner plate sealed with some transparent kitchen film.

Without moisture, the cannabis root simply dries out and dies. Under high magnification you will notice that the tap root is covered with numerous delicate root hairs. These will dry out and die unless the root is kept in moist (but never soaked) conditions. You will notice the cannabis root turning brown. Just as with an over-watered seed, once the root is showing discolouration and dying it is often damaged beyond repair.

Soaked cotton pads, saturated tissues or even waterlogged soil in a closed container all show the same issue when soaked. Soaked seeds won’t develop roots at all or they will stop their development.

So make sure your environment is moist but never soaked, and give your feminised seeds and autoflower seeds the best chance to germinate. Note that there are no differences in the techniques used to germinate feminised seeds and autoflower seeds, the same germination methods are used.

It’s also worth adding that the appearance of a cannabis seed (colour, size, shape etc) won’t have any influence on the speed of germination.

Related:
Everything you need to know about cannabis roots
What does the appearance of a cannabis seed indicate?

How much water should I use for a successful germination?

If you are germinating your cannabis seeds between lightly sprayed cotton pads, the pads only need 5 short sprays to moisten them. Remember, the key principle is to provide a healthy environment with both moisture and some air. If you try to germinate your cannabis seeds in a water-saturated environment for too long the roots will simply rot. It doesn’t matter whether that environment is cotton pads, soil or any other material. Moist conditions will work, but sodden/saturated conditions will eventually cause the root to rot and die.

One of the most reliable ways to germinate cannabis seeds is simply to place them between two cotton pads which have been lightly sprayed 5 times with water. Just leave the pads for a couple of days in a sealed environment so that the cotton pads don’t dry out. The golden rule is to spray the pads lightly. Cannabis seeds thrive in moist conditions but can die quickly in soaked conditions

Related:
Cotton Pad germination video tutorial
Soil germination video tutorial

How long for germination of weed seeds?

Usually it takes somewhere between a couple of days to a week for your cannabis seeds to germinate. Occasionally seeds can take a couple of weeks. To avoid seed germination issues, remember the important basic principle for cannabis seeds; offer an environment which balances moisture with some aeration for root development. Therefore, germinating your seeds in a light soil mix will give better results than a heavy clay-based soil.

How often to water weed seedlings? / When and how much water to give to cannabis seedlings?

Watering should be offered only to keep the soil moist and prevent it from drying out. Remember that the small cannabis root (often called a tap root) will need to absorb very little moisture initially. The main focus is to allow the root to develop through a light, aerated grow medium which doesn’t obstruct the root growth, not should it allow the root to dry out.

2. Germinating cannabis seeds outdoors

Many people love to germinate their cannabis seeds outdoors, especially outdoor/greenhouse growers. Why not? That’s the way that seeds have evolved over millions of years to germinate. However, it’s worth noting that in nature a plant can produce hundred/thousands of seeds but only need a few of them to make it past germination in order for the next generation to survive. Cannabis growers, on the other hand, like to see germination rates of 90%-100%, especially if they have bought premium cannabis seeds for their specific requirements and grow location.

However, outdoor growers can struggle to achieve good germination rates if they rely on outdoor seed germination. Conditions can fluctuate dramatically, especially during the unpredictable early season weather.

Temperatures and/or weather can swing significantly between night and day, reducing germination rates and killing weaker seedlings. If the weather is cold and wet with persistent rain, the seeds may simply rot in the ground and never emerge. Even if they do, slugs/snails/birds may get to the seedlings before you do.

If the early season weather produces a heat wave, your seeds may dry out if the roots haven’t been able to reach deep enough for moisture. Germinating cannabis seeds outdoors may work for some seeds, but it’s not recommended for the highest germination rates.

Those that germinate cannabis seeds outdoors in containers may find that the containers get very hot in direct sunlight – especially dark/black coloured containers which absorb the suns heat. Temperatures around (or above) 35ºC/95ºF can kill the seeds/seedlings through excessive heat. That’s why many successful outdoor cannabis growers prefer to germinate their cannabis seeds indoors where conditions can be opted to minimise seed germination issues.

What is the best temperature for germinating cannabis seeds?

The temperatures found in an average house, 20ºC – 25ºC are perfect for cannabis seed germination.

Many serious outdoor growers germinate their seeds indoors to maximise germination rates and then perhaps grow their seedlings indoors under artificial light for a couple of weeks to give them the best possible start before risking them in the great outdoors. It’s the best way to avoid seed germination issues and ensure the maximum number of your precious cannabis seeds make it into healthy adult plants.

Related:
Outdoor cannabis seed collection from Dutch Passion
Best ways to grow cannabis outdoors

3. Overheating seedlings with heating mats

For good cannabis seed germination rates you need both moisture and warmth. Seeds which might germinate at ambient indoor temperatures in summer may not germinate quite so easily in winter in a cold part of your house. Sometimes during the cooler months, the indoor temperature may need a small boost. That’s why many growers use an electrically powered, plug-in heating mat. This can be set to a specific temperature to provide the warmth required to avoid seed germination issues.

Overheating cannabis seeds will slowly cook and destroy your seedlings.

The plant pots, or propagator, simply sit on top of the heat mat. These can be a great solution for cold periods in winter. However the Dutch Passion team have come across cases where heat mats are used all year round. In summer, this is unnecessary and can result in overheated plant containers and seeds which have been damaged/destroyed by the high temperature.

When indoor temperatures are already 20-25 ºC there is no reason to risk adding extra heat, especially if it can’t escape. The danger is overheated soil and sterilised seeds. In combination with excess moisture/excess water, cannabis seeds and the delicate tissues inside are slowly cooked and destroyed. This can occur if the excess heat from the mat can’t escape and builds up in the plant containers over time.

Should I use a heating mat for germination?

Yes you can, but use them during colder periods such as winter time. You may also wish to use a thermometer to confirm that temperatures are being maintained within the preferred 20-25ºC range.

What temperature should I put my heating mat on?

Because heat can build up in soil or in a propagator, be sure not to set the temperature too high. Temperature settings of around 20-22 degrees should ensure a nice warm environment, without risking overheating.

4. Fertilising cannabis seedlings incorrectly

When seedlings first sprout they are very sensitive to their growing environment. Strong light at close range will damage their delicate leaf tissues easily. Temperature extremes and large temperature swings/cold nights can also be fatal to them. That is why you have to be careful growing your seedlings in the first 1-2 weeks.

A common mistake seen by the Dutch Passion customer service team is excessive nutrition/fertiliser being given to seedlings. Cannabis growers often use a wide variety of nutrients/fertilisers to grow their plants. Sometimes they make the mistake of adding a lot of these during the first stages of growing. In the worst cases, this can permanently stunt growth, or kill the plant.

Seedlings and their delicate root systems can’t handle a nutrient rich environment very well. Nor were they designed to. The seedlings have everything they need for a healthy initial germination and development inside the seed itself. That is how nature made them. So when seeds first sprout, they don’t need any fertilizer at all!

When to start using nutrients with germinated cannabis seeds?

Many growers prefer not to add any fertilizer or additives during the first week of growth. Your seedling will not need it at this time, and will only be damaged if exposed to an excess of nutrients or fertilizer. If you are growing in a good quality soil, you may not need to add any extra nutrients for a week or two. Even then, you should only consider weak/starter nutrients and slowly build up concentrations.

5. Germinating seeds in jiffy pods, coffee filters and rockwool cubes

Of all methods used for germination, these methods are the ones that give the most issues and are often done incorrectly. This is backed up from customer feedback and the 30+ years of experience from the Dutch Passion customer service team. During the decades of seed supply, Dutch Passion (and their customers) have accumulated extensive experience of which cannabis seed germination methods are safe to use, and which are best to avoid.

Of course, many growers will argue that these methods have always worked well for them. But that doesn’t mean that the methods are completely bullet-proof with a wide working latitude for everyone.

Some growers find that cannabis seed germination in jiffy pods work pretty well. The main concern for the Dutch Passion team is that these methods are not quite as bullet-proof with the same wide-latitude as the preferred method of germinating cannabis seeds between moist cotton pads.

Experience from the Dutch Passion team is that there are many ways to incorrectly perform cannabis seed germination with jiffy pods, coffee filters and rock wool cubes. You may be better off using a safer, less troublesome method with a wider working latitude and reduced risk of getting it wrong. Therefore Dutch Passion recommend customers not to use them.

What is wrong with germinating seeds in Jiffy pods?

Water has to be added to jiffy pods in order to use them. The Dutch Passion team have seen many cases where growers completely soaked the jiffies before use. Other growers will even stand the jiffy pods in a shallow tray of water while seeds are germinating in them. In the worst cases, this results in a soaked environment in which cannabis seeds won’t germinate (or with reduced germination rates).

Jiffy seed pods work well for larger seeds e.g. beans, where there is less to go wrong. But for cannabis seeds there can be seed germination issues when used incorrectly and for that reason Jiffy pods are not recommended.

What is wrong with germinating seeds Rock wool cubes?

Rock wool cubes are sometimes used for germination, but perhaps they are used more often for creating clones and allowing cuttings to develop new roots. For that purpose they work well. When used for germination, however, the same issues can occur as with the jiffies. Overwatering, overheating or placing the seeds too deep in the rock wool (glasswool) cube can cause seed germination issues for less experienced growers. Therefore rock wool cubes are not preferred if you’re looking for a low risk method for germinating your autoflower seeds or feminised seeds.

What is wrong with germinating cannabis seeds in coffee filters?

One of the more unusual and unwieldy methods for cannabis seed germination is the use of coffee filters. The seed tip is placed pointing downwards inside a wet coffee filter, inside a large sealed bag. This is often hung from a hanger against a door or inside a closet. The idea is that the roots grow downwards by hanging them vertically.

Along with many things that can go wrong with this method, we feel it’s unnecessarily complicated, gravity will always make sure roots find their way down anyway. Therefore we do not recommend customers to use it. One of the main risks is that the coffee filter will hold too much water and soak the seeds, causing root rot.

What methods work best for germinating cannabis seeds?

There are a lot of methods that can be used, but some have higher margins for errors. The methods may work fine for others but not necessarily you e.g. due to too much water being present at the root level. One of the most common cannabis seed germination methods is still the moist cotton pad method (or moist kitchen tissue). Customers are free to use a method which works best for them. However the Dutch Passion team feel that there are less things to go wrong, and maximum chances of success with the moist cotton pad method.

Is soaking seeds in a glass of water a good germination method?

As previously mentioned, cannabis seeds like a moist environment but do not perform well in soaked/saturated one. When they are exposed to a soaked environment e.g. several days in a glass of water, you may experience seed germination issues. This is especially the case when the seed is left soaking for long periods.

Many people soak their seeds in a glass of water for a day before putting them on moist cotton pads or moist kitchen tissue. The Dutch Passion customer service team feel that this is an unnecessary step. Seeds will absorb moisture from water or cotton pads in just the same way without the risk of root rot associated with over-soaking your seeds.

If you are planning to germinate your cannabis seeds in soil and wish to soak them in a glass of water first, we advise to soak them for no longer than 12 hours.

6. Damping off cannabis seedlings

Damping off’ is a disease which affects seedlings. It is caused by several different fungi (and fungus-like) organisms. This disease causes a thin stem which is unable to support the emerging seedling. The result is that the seedlings collapse, often under a white mass of fungal growth.

Damping off is most common in young seedlings and can be caused by overwatering your soil. It also happens when you use contaminated soil, e.g. from your back garden. The fungi Rhizoctonia and Fusarium, alongside Pythium plant parasites are the most common pathogens responsible for damping off. Note that Pythium is often transported around on the feet of fungus gnats, which can be a common pest in soils made with composted wood.

See also  Hybrid Cannabis Seeds

Once your seedling starts suffering from damping off, there is little you can do to save it.

How to avoid damping off my seedlings?

If you use fresh soil, and make sure you don’t overwater it, there should be little risk of damping off. Once plants have mature leaves and a well developed root system, they are better able to naturally resist the fungus that causes damping off.

7. Stretching seedlings caused by lack of light

After your cannabis seeds have successfully germinated it’s time to provide good care for your seedlings. This includes light, one of the most important factors for healthy plant development. Once your seedlings have sprouted it’s important to provide it with good quality lighting, either natural sunlight or an artificial indoor grow light. If the lighting is too powerful, it can kill a vulnerable new seedling. Some growers like to use specially designed ‘T5’ fluorescent tubes for cultivating seedlings, or perhaps some LED light bars designed for seedlings.

Stretching cannabis seedlings due to insufficient lighting.

But if the lighting is of an insufficient strength, the seedlings will ‘stretch’ upwards in an attempt to find the light. In the worst cases, this can cause serious issues or cause the seedling to die. This happens when the elongated stem simply is unable to support its own weight.

Light remains one of the most important environmental factors in growing a cannabis plant. Growing in a poorly illuminated environment with low light levels results in a stretched out plant with few leaves. What leaves there are tend to be very small in size. Because leaves are the “solar panels” that collect energy for the flowers, your yield will also be minimal in low light conditions.

How do I fix stretching cannabis seedlings?

It’s not necessarily the biggest problem if your seedlings have stretched, so long as you support the stems in time. This can be done with a small support, such as a small stick/cane. Some growers support a stretched seedling with a short length of drinking straw which has been slit down the side with scissors.

Most plants will recover and grow up to become healthy plants. Once the seedling has sufficient light it will stop stretching and instead use the energy to develop bigger/more leaves and a healthy plant/root structure. If you have stretched seedlings in their original pre-grow containers, you can also fix the issue by transplanting them into a new container and covering the elongated stem with soil.

The use of gradually increasing light is highly recommend for seedlings after a successful germination.

What is the best type of lights for cannabis seedlings?

The use of gradually increasing light is highly recommend for seedlings after a successful germination. Initially this can be done with relatively simple Fluorescent lights (e.g. T5/T8) or CFL’s (Compact Fluorescent lights). Both types are frequently used for the first couple of weeks after germination and provide the plants with ample blue dominant light for the first weeks of growth.

Other relatively inexpensive options are LED seedling light bars like the SanLight Flex series. These are long-lasting, high quality lights. Many modern growers have invested in specialist lighting for seedlings and get great results. But note that these seedling lights lack the power to grow mature cannabis plants. You will need a high powered light for bloom. HPS lights are a common choice and are cheap, though a high quality LED grow light will give a superior light spectrum, reduced heat stress, longer life and superior quality/results.

Related:
How to grow weed easily indoors, expert tips and advice

How do you know when it’s time to go from seedling to veg lighting?

Once cannabis seedlings are a couple of weeks old, many growers will move them from their ‘seedling light’ to a light which is a little more powerful. Allowing the seedlings a week or two to gain some strength before transferring them to a grow room containing the more powerful full spectrum lights is generally regarded as good practice.

Some lights that are perfect for seedlings are:

  • Fluoresced lights T5/T8
  • San light flex series
  • Growspec Sunray Series
  • California Lightworks Solar System Veg Light (Or SolarSystem + optional controller).

Since their introduction, LED lights have improved significantly. Affordability has also improved and LED is now the first choice for serious, professional cannabis growers.

Quality LED lights with full spectrum control can be used from the vegetive phase through to harvest. Light spectrum can be adjusted along the way ensuring that the plants always receive optimised light. The best spectrum for veg is blue dominant spectrum with perhaps some white. Blue spectrum light (400-500nm) will promotes healthy vegetative growth producing large, strong and healthy leaves and branches.

Examples of LED lights with a full cycle (veg to harvest) controllable spectrum are those from California Lightworks and GrowSpec. The California Lightworks Solar System series also includes purpose designed ‘veg’ lights with a fixed blue dominant spectrum.

Of course, cannabis seedlings can also be grown with excellent quality results under full spectrum (LED) lights as long as the correct light distance-to-canopy is maintained. Check with the manufacturers guidelines, which will vary according to the size and power of the LED light. Growers are often cautious to carefully acclimatise their seedlings when switching them from seedling lights to powerful ‘main grow room’ lights.

This can be done simply by ensuring that the main grow light is hoisted to a high position in the grow room, well above the seedlings. As the seedlings start to mature the light-to-plant distance can be gradually reduced. Once in full bloom, the plant is ready for maximum light levels.

When and how long to put seedlings under light?

It’s best to refer to the specific guidelines from the lights manufacturers. Grow lights come in a wide range of sizes and power outputs designed for different hanging heights and different sized grow rooms.

How long to light seedlings? Most people give the seedlings 18-24 hours of daily light. This allows them to grow leaves, roots and branches but not buds. Flowering only starts when light hours are reduced to around 12 hours per day, usually after around 4-6 weeks of vegetative growth.

8. Choosing the wrong type of soil to germinate seeds

Using some soil from their back garden to germinate cannabis seeds in is something the Dutch Passion customer service team see from time to time. This is usually a beginners mistake, or an attempt to cut a few corners and save cash. But it really isn’t recommended.

Sometimes the soil is healthy enough, and seeds will germinate without issues. But in many cases, the soil is too sandy (or too heavy with a high clay content). Garden soil may also contain unhelpful mold/fungi/pests or it may be too strongly fertilised. Often soil from the growers compost pile is used for seedlings.

The logic is that it is fresh, natural and perfect for growing. However, freshly composted soil can often be very nutrient rich. Perfect for mature plants, but toxic to seedlings, which are delicate and need only light nutrition (if any).

In other cases where garden soil has been used you may see mold developing over the soil surface, giving it a white discolouration. Seedlings affected by mold can have a high risk of damping off and dying.

What type of soil should I use for germinating cannabis seeds?

For the best result make sure you use clean, fresh soil. This can be found in a garden centre or grow shop. It may be described as a ‘light soil’ mix or a seedling soil. Don’t use strongly fertilised soil. Normal potting soil is often good to use. But for optimal results we advise a 50/50 mix of light-mix and coco substrate. This mixture is very easy for roots to grow in, and has just enough nutrients for the seedlings to get started.

When your seedling is 1-2 weeks old, the roots and plant can handle more nutrients and a very light feeding schedule can be used. When it comes to nutrients and young plants, err on the side of caution. It is better to feed plants with weak nutrients and slowly build up nutrient concentrations than to start with strong nutrients which can damage or kill young plants.

Also recommended are products like the Biotabs Starterkit. This allows you to prepare your soil in advance for the entire grow with slow-release organic nutrients. All you have to do then is water your plant, and leave nature to do the rest.

9. Not transplanting autoflower seedling to a larger size pot in time

Since the introduction of autoflowers years ago, this has been a common issue. While photoperiod plants can stay in a small container for a longer period of time during veg growth, autoflower plants may not always respond well to it. Autoflowers benefit greatly from a good start and a decent sized container. Therefore providing good care of them during the first weeks is important. Remember that autoflower seeds produce plants with a fixed life span and no time to recover if they have been root bound in a small container for too long.

A key role in this is the cannabis root system. Autoflowers have a main root stem that grows straight down. If this root is interrupted or damaged, it will result in a tiny plant. So it’s very important to transplant your autoflower to a large pot in time, also known as “potting up”.

Many growers will tell you that you have to germinate your autoflower in it’s final pot. However this can make the germination process a little more difficult. Instead, germination in a smaller sized container e.g. about 1 litre is a good alternative. You can keep your autoflower in this pot for about a week (maximum 2 – 2.5 weeks) and then transplant it to the final pot. In many tests over the years this has never caused a problem. When “potting up” do make sure the main root has enough room to point all the way down, by digging a deep enough hole.

When and how to transplant cannabis seedlings in a bigger pot?

How to transplant a seedling? One easy way is to fill the larger container with grow medium and then make a ‘hole’ in it with the small container currently containing your seedling. This will be the perfect size for the root ball of your seedling. But make sure that you don’t over-compact the new grow medium when you make the hole.

Many growers will water the new grow medium well before transplanting the seedling in it, this allows the roots to quickly expand into their new territory. Some growers sprinkle some beneficial Mycorrhizal bacteria into the hole to assist onward root development.

What pot size should I use to grow autoflowers?

When growing autoflower seeds most growers find that they perform well in any pot from 10 litres and above. However, because of the limited life cycle of about 11 weeks, there is no need to go much larger than 30 litres. And of course you can also plant your autoflower plants directly into the outdoor earth in your garden, without any pot restriction.

What pot size should I use to grow photoperiod cannabis plants?

When growing feminised photoperiod seeds, the plant can be maintained in veg growth until you are ready to reduce daily light hours to induce bloom. This means that you can keep a plant for several weeks in a smaller plant container, perhaps 10 litres or so, until bloom.

As you get ready to flip the plant into bloom, many growers will take the opportunity to first transplant it into a larger container. But much depends on the space constraints in your grow room, the number of plants you wish to grow, the period of veg growth and other factors. There will be a large difference, for example, in the container sizes used for Sea Of Green (SOG) growing vs Screen Of Green (SCROG cannabis cultivation method)

Related:
How to grow cannabis with the Sea Of Green (SOG) method
How to grow cannabis with the Screen Of Green (SCROG) method

10. Sowing cannabis seeds too deep in the soil

Cannabis seeds don’t need to be buried deeply to germinate well. Placing your autoflower seeds or feminised seeds 3-5mm deep is sufficient for a fast and healthy germination. Your seed should not be deeper than 10mm. If you place the seed to deep, it will have trouble making it to the surface. While it’s trying to do so, the risks of rotting, overheating and getting damaged increase.

Sowing your autoflower or feminised seeds 3-5mm deep is sufficient for a fast and healthy germination.

In rare cases some growers have been known to simply scatter their seeds on top of the soil, like sowing a grain field. This method is definitely not recommended.

How deep do you sow cannabis seeds?

We advise a 3-5mm depth. But make sure not to go deeper than 1cm.

Bonus tip: How to get the seed shell off a weed seedling

many growers have been tempted to ‘help’ their plants germinate by trying to pull the seed shell off the weed seedling. This is simply never recommended. Pulling the seed shell off before it is ready can damage the seedling which derives some nutrition from the seed before it is discarded.

In the worst cases, the seed shell simply sticks to one of the cotyledon leaves (the first pair of baby leaves) where it will do no harm. Just leave the seed shell, it’s not worth risking the removal of it.

Hopefully this article has given you some useful advice and helpful information. Cannabis seed germination isn’t difficult if you follow a few proven rules and principles. Good luck, and enjoy growing!

11 Comments . Leave new

excellent article thank you very much Dutch passion,realy good one.

Had a seed shell stuck, so much that it ripped off the other cotaledan off at the base. It’s almost three weeks old now, still just a nice green 1 coteledan leaf, sure hope she pulls out of it and grows. As long as it stays sturdy and green I’ll let it be. Let ya know what happens. If and when that may be, I try to make a few leafs appear everyday when I scope it, but so far nothing yet. There’s still hope

if your talking about an auto my friend then that seedling is finished due to the life span they have once they sprout they have a life span of about 10 to 11 weeks and in that time they have to veg and flower if ur veg cycle is weak then ur flower cycle will be almost none existant

Can I start my seeds inside in my grow room, and then transfer them to my greenhouse with different lighting and different lighting time due to the early season?

As long as you are not too early in the growing season this should be fine.

Your plants can get a nice start if you start the growing process indoors

Greetings,
Joe
Dutch Passion

Thanks for the actual sound information, I wish I found this a few weeks ago. As a new grower I’m finding the hardest part of growing to be finding solid reliable information amongst the sea of first year masters.

This is my first year growing from seed and am 1/7 with my first batch and 1/14 (two days in) on my second run of seeds. I’m gearing I’ve over watered both times in my pods. Is it worth while trying to ring them out to try and dry them out a bit or just leave them be and pray?

We are very welcome!
When seeds are starting to germinate they are very delicate, so I do not advice you to try to take them out and let them dry. Best to hope these will survive and next time you should follow our guides

Greetings,
Joe
Dutch Passion

I have a small amount of seeds from a plant I grew last year. Second generation. Unknown origin. Extremely potent. The female plant sprouted a single male pollen sac stem, and produced the small amount of seeds on the plant. The seeds are like no other that I have ever seen in my over 50 years of using, and over 10 years growing cannabis. When put in a small container, they stick to each other, and glaze over with a resin-coated glaze. Have you ever seen or heard of seeds like these? Even when removed from container and separated, then put back in container, they reglaze over again. Excited to attempt to grow this year, outdoors. Any germination tips for such sticky seeds? Thank you!

Hello Bud Farmer,

That’s is a strange occurrence you have with your seeds, the thing we think of when you say a resin-coated glaze is THC. But this is not a normal thing for seeds to contain. Our advice is to stick to the regular germination advice we give here and wish you good luck with this years grow!

Greetings,
Joe
Dutch Passion

I have never grown a plant before. I hot some homegrown and it was littered with seeds, so I planted two, and now have two plants. The are doing well, I can see the little round leaves, then two little pot leaves, and today I noticed two more little pot leaves growing from the middle of that. They are loving the outdoors. I water in the AM and in the PM. I have been doing alot of reading, and now I am so confused. What stage am I in and what should I be looking for if they are doing good? Oh, and how do I know if it is a male or female?

See also  Coco Chill Calming Body Oil With Cannabis Sativa Seed Reviews

seeds stopped growing

Hello peeps, okay a few weeks ago i bought 5 big buddha seeds (bubble cheese).
i soaked them for a few days, fine.
I then put them into the paper towel method, all good
About a week ago i planted them into the seed tray with bnq cutting compost, one has sprouted and another is just sitting on the surface. They seem to have completly stopped?
They sit in a heated propagator lid off during the day, lid on at night.
help..

moash
New Member

Hello peeps, okay a few weeks ago i bought 5 big buddha seeds (bubble cheese).
i soaked them for a few days, fine.
I then put them into the paper towel method, all good
About a week ago i planted them into the seed tray with bnq cutting compost, one has sprouted and another is just sitting on the surface. They seem to have completly stopped?
They sit in a heated propagator lid off during the day, lid on at night.
help..

nuera59
Well-Known Member

it’s funny because two have sprouted but have now stopped completly. The other 3 haven’t moved at all.
I’ve germed seeds this way before with no problem.
I’m starting to worry, I feel like they are deff going to die. it’s been about a week since the soil.
should I keep the soil wet/moist? should I mist the two? they also still have the seed on top.

ROBINBANKS
New Member

keep them in the dark, or have a small ultra violet on them, as you know all seeds strains etc are different but when it comes to the start of life there is NO rules, ive had seeds show and grow after 3 days, and just when ive gave up on the rest they have showed sometimes as much as 9/12 days later, just keep them moist and warm and dont feck about with them, hope they come good for you, id also have the dome lid ”ON” and the vents open.

Also in the future id just soak for 24hrs then go straight to soil and your dome, i get 100% with this method each time, when you place your seed in the water at the start make sure the water has been standing for a few days and try not to handle the beans ok.
use tweasers

Closet Grow (BuD)
Active Member
nuera59
Well-Known Member

nice one fellas, unfortunatly I don’t have a camara.
sweet banks, so your saying let them b.To be honest they soaked right up untill they split (with no root poking out), then for about 2/3 days in the kitchen roll, which let the tap root to grow to about half a little fingernail.
Then strait into the bnq cutting compost.
The cutting compost is about 6 months old (still smells pretty fresh).
They are under a 40w twin tube flouresent for 17/18 hours light a day.
The propagator is heated, and gets pretty hot.
The last 30 odd seeds I’ve done at separate intervals have succeeded.
DAM!

Legal Ize
Member

could be gnat larva in soil eating on your babies, had it happen b4. or could be lack of moisture(they got dried out overnight) or tap root might not be correctly in soil and has some air space around it so it cant really suck up moisture or dig into the dirt. ive also had seeds that the tap root just kept diggin down and down then days later i saw the seed pop up n days after that the seed finally split open to reveal itself.

ROBINBANKS
New Member

nice one fellas, unfortunatly I don’t have a camara.
sweet banks, so your saying let them b.To be honest they soaked right up untill they split (with no root poking out), then for about 2/3 days in the kitchen roll, which let the tap root to grow to about half a little fingernail.
Then strait into the bnq cutting compost.
The cutting compost is about 6 months old (still smells pretty fresh).
They are under a 40w twin tube flouresent for 17/18 hours light a day.
The propagator is heated, and gets pretty hot.
The last 30 odd seeds I’ve done at separate intervals have succeeded.
DAM!

I just soak for 24hrs then straight to the soil, place down just under the surface give them a nice spray into prop lid closed vents closed till its misty then open vents, place in the dark, anything else they need they will get from the soil, keep the soil moist NEVER let dry out and they will all come good with just a little time and patients. start them off in a pot around the size of a coffee mug for about the 1st 2 weeks then pot on to 5ltr pots, then up to 10/15 ltr pots to finish.

Common Seedling Problems & Mistakes

Before we take a look at cannabis seedling problems and common beginner mistakes, let’s show you what healthy cannabis seedlings and young plants look like! If your plants look like this, you’re golden!

Healthy Cannabis Seedlings Look Like This!

Examples of healthy cannabis seedlings:

Cannabis seedlings start with two round leaves known as “cotyledons.” These leaves are already formed inside the seed and simply open up once the seed has sprouted. After the cotyledons emerge, the “true” (serrated) cannabis leaves will start to grow from the center.

As they get older, the leaves start looking more like the cannabis leaf you are probably most familiar with. Here’s what those seedlings look like as they start growing into healthy young cannabis plants…

Now that you know what healthy young cannabis plants look like; let’s take a look at some common seedling problems to avoid so your plants grow as fast and healthy as possible!

Common Cannabis Seedling Problems

1.) Overwatering

Symptoms: seedling is droopy, growing medium is moist, damping off

Most common causes:

When a cannabis plant is “overwatered” it has less to do with the water and more to do with oxygen. Plants can even grow directly in water (hydroponics) but in order to thrive, roots need oxygen. In hydroponics, that’s accomplished by dissolving oxygen into the water. But when plants are grown in a container, too much water = not enough oxygen.

When a plant’s roots are sitting in water, they quickly use up all the oxygen until the growing medium starts to dry out. Without enough oxygen at the roots, the plant will start showing symptoms of oxygen deprivation. Luckily, there are many steps you can take to prevent overwatering your cannabis plants.

While overwatering can display many different symptoms, most overwatered cannabis plants look droopy, like this…

Despite what seems like an obvious cause, several different scenraios can end in overwatering. Here are some of the most common trouble-makers:

Big Pot, Small Seedling

When you have a small plant in a very big pot, it’s easy to overwater because the roots aren’t drinking much yet, and the big container takes a long time to dry out.

Notice how the plants in smaller containers have grown more than the plant that was put in a big container as a seedling. It’s common for plants in too-big containers to grow a little slowly at first.

  • (Recommended) Start seedlings in smaller container until they’re growing vigorously, then transfer to a larger container
  • If seedling is already in a big container, there’s still hope! When watering, give just a little water at a time in a small circle around the seedling. Then allow the top inch of your medium to mostly dry before watering again. Once the plant is growing vigorously, start watering as normal (with extra runoff water coming out the bottom every time)

These small cannabis plants (below) were put in big pots, and were given enough water to support a much larger plant. The plants couldn’t drink all the water that was given to them and as a result, their roots weren’t able to get the oxygen they needed and started “drowning.” Once the roots are out of commission, the leaves start drooping.

One way to prevent this from happening is to make sure your plants are in an appropriately sized container for each stage of their life; this is done with transplanting.

First, you need to get a general idea of the final container size which will be based on how big you want your plants to grow. The less often you transplant, the bigger the final size pot you’ll need because the roots will tend to grow out and cover the whole container if left too long. You can help avoid problems with roots getting rootbound by using a fabric pot (also known as a “Smart Pot”) or an air pot.

Final Container for Desired Plant Size – General guide
(the less often you transplant your plants, the bigger final size you’ll need)

12″ ~ 2-3 gallon container

24″ ~ 3-5 gallon container

36″ ~ 5-7 gallon container

48″ ~ 6-10 gallon container

60″ ~ 8-10+ gallon container

But what size pot should you use for your seedlings?

For fastest growth rates, it’s better to plant young seedlings or clones in a very small container, like a disposable plastic solo cup.

For new seedlings and clones, use a small container if possible

Easy transplant guide – some popular transplant guideline:

  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 3 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 2 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1.5 gal -> 3 gal -> 5+ gal

There is no perfect transplant guide, but the one above should give you a general idea of where to start.

Why don’t you want to go from a solo cup to a 5 gallon pot? Or why not just start in a 5 gallon pot?

Young plants won’t be growing very fast yet, so they also won’t be using much water. When you completely saturate a big container that slow speed means that the plant won’t be able to drink all the water. Since so much of the water is contained in the middle without access to air, it won’t be able to dry out by evaporation. This means you’re left with a huge container full of wet potting mix.

The young cannabis plant roots will quickly use up all the available oxygen that’s been dissolved in the water, and then the roots will sit in water until the water slowly evaporates on its own. Some containers such as smart pots and air pots allow air in from the sides, which can help dry the growing medium faster, but it’s better to use proper technique from the beginning.

Planting in too big a container is sometimes called “overpotting.” It’s possible to get around this with special watering techniques (for example by giving plants just a little bit of water until they start “growing into” their containers) but starting plants in small containers and transplanting as needed can be a more straightforward way for some growers. Overpotting plants is also a waste of growing medium and nutrients, especially if the plants never get big enough to fully use their containers.

This OG Tahoe Kush seedling was overpotted, though this can be overcome by the grower just giving a little bit of water at a time until the plant starts growing vigorously. At that point, the grower can provide more and more water until they’re finally watering normally.

More information about container size and transplanting here: https://www.growweedeasy.com/germinate#what-size-pot

Small Pot, Big Seedling

While using a too-large container can cause problems for seedlings, so can too-small of a container.

Seedlings are happy in a small container like a solo cup for a while, but as they get bigger, their roots need more room. The roots tend to wrap around the outsides of the container, encasing the middle part so that water can’t get out. This is known as the plant being “root bound.”

If the seedling isn’t transferred to a bigger container in time, it can cause symptoms of overwatering, nutrient deficiencies, wilting, and sometimes very strange and unpredictable symptoms.

These plants were left in a too-small container for too long. Because they were drinking so fast, the grower watered them frequently – too frequently! This combination of being root bound and overwatering caused the plants to suffer.

A too small container, combined with overwatering – these conditions can cause some strange symptoms that often look like a nutrient deficiency

Pink leaves, red discoloration, rusty spots and edges… While it make look like these cannabis seedlings are experiencing nutrient deficiencies, all these symptoms are actually caused by a combination of overwatering plus a too-small pot.

When the roots aren’t happy, the plant isn’t able to uptake nutrients properly and cannabis seedlings can show a wide variety of strange problems.

It’s usually not a good sign when cannabis leaves start “crossing their fingers” like this (instead of having all the leaf tips spread out). While this can happen naturally every once in a while, you know for sure that you’re having a problem if the crossed fingers are combined with discoloration of the leaves. Also notice how the stems are bright red/pink.

The following cannabis plant was also overwatered and had no drainage. Notice how dark the soil is and the green algae growing all along the top of the soil – these are more signs the plant has been overwatered for quite a while. You should never water your plant when the soil on top is still wet, and if you notice lots of algae growing on top of your soil, it may be a sign that you’re overwatering on a regular basis. Leaving the top of the soil wet is also the number one reason growers get fungus gnats.

No Drainage (or poor drainage)

Cannabis roots need oxygen to thrive, and therefore they will have trouble if the roots are “drowned.” If water cannot run out the bottom of the container, it will pool at the roots, which causes overwatered plants.

  • Always start with a good growing medium that drains well – never use a clay based soil which holds onto way too much water. A high quality potting mix (especially mixed with some perlite) provides great drainage
  • Start with a smaller container to reduce the chances of overwatering seedlings
  • Make sure there are plenty of drainage holes to let water out the bottom of the container
  • If water runs through growing medium slowly, you can mix perlite into the potting mix to increase oxygen and quicken drainage
  • Water less often and less at a time until plant is drinking more
  • Get a container that helps the growing medium dry out from the sides (such as “Smart Pots” – highly recommended; or air pots).
  • Don’t allow plants to sit in a tray that has been collecting runoff water

This seedling started “damping off” (dying) due to terrible drainage from bad soil. Never use soil that looks like it contains clay!

Seedling is “damping off” due to bad soil with no drainage

Here’s another example of a seedling damping off due to too much water (drowning roots), whis time combined with not enough light. After a few days of these conditions, this seedling just fell over and started dying.

The following plant was grown in an unsuitable growing medium with no drainage and started showing signs of overwatering. Always start with a quality potting mix that has good drainage, and never allow the top of your growing medium to look this wet!

This “soil” is more like mud. The plant roots are drowning from lack of oxygen, causing severe wilting.

Watering too often

While oxygen is available to the roots immediately after watering, the roots use up all the oxygen quickly if they are sitting in water. If all the oxygen is gone, roots are not able to get what they need to help power growth, at least not until the growing medium begins to dry out and create new air spaces in the growing medium.

Keep roots happy for fast-growing plants

Each air spot in the potting mix provides roots with precious oxygen, but if there’s no air spots, roots start to “drown.” By watering seedlings less often, growers can ensure that roots are getting access to plenty of oxygen at all times.

Of course you should never allow roots to actually dry out – roots need moisture at all times. But for new growers who want to do everything possible for their new seedlings, it can seem like more water = better. Unfortunately, this isn’t true.

Roots work best when they get as much oxygen as possible while also staying completely moist at all times.

  • Wait until top inch is dry. Make sure that the top bit of potting mix has started to dry before you water seedlings again. Sometimes it can take a few days, depending on your growing medium, your environment and how much water you provided during the last watering.
  • Increase the number of air pockets in the growing medium by mixing in a “lighter” amendment like perlite to the potting mix. Perlite will allow the mix to hold onto more oxygen when mixed with heavy soil. Many cannabis soil growers will mix 30-40% perlite into their potting mix to make sure there’s lots of drainage and plenty of air available for the roots.
  • Provide air from the sides. Transplant to a container which allows air in from the sides like fabric pots (“Smart Pots” – highly recommended) or air pots. until plant gets bigger so there’s less water in the potting mix that needs to dry. You’ll be able to water your plants more often while ensuring they get plenty of oxygen.
  • Water less when it’s cold. Plant processes tend to slow down when temps get cooler. This means that plants usually need water less often than normal after a cold snap.
See also  Homegrown Cannabis Company Seeds

This plant went through a few cool days but the grower continued to water as normal. As a result, the plants roots were surrounded by too much water and the plant started showing signs of overwatering.

The plant was watered the right amount each time, but too often. As a result, it shows some slight drooping. While this won’t kill the plant, the plant will definitely grow faster when the mix is allowed to dry out a bit so the roots are getting plenty of oxygen.

2.) Underwatering – seedling is droopy, wilting, or not growing properly, and the growing medium around the seedling isn’t moist

While overwatering is the most common seedling symptom, underwatering is also a problem, especially for those who have been warned to avoid giving too much water.

It can be confusing because the symptoms often look similar to each other, which is why it’s important to learn good watering practices.

This seedling was underwatered – the grower had been warned many times to avoid overwatering, and went too far in the other direction. Notice that the growing medium looks bone dry.

It’s crucially important to make sure that plant roots have access to moisture at all times. Plants are constantly losing water through their leaves (called “transpiration”) and this is actually how plants get water up from the roots. As the plants lose water from the leaves, it pulls water up from the ground like a straw.

When there’s not enough water at the roots, many plant processes cease to function. If roots actually dry out, the dried shoots die.

Here’s another example of a young cannabis plant that is underwatered, even in a big container (where the problem is usually overwatering). Notice how this cannabis seedling is basically just wilting and falling over, while the potting mix looks completely dry.

Seedlings suffer greatly from being underwatered, even more so than from overwatering. Often the grower will actually be able to see how dry the growing medium is. A big sign that the plant is being under-watered is when you can see the soil separating from the container. In this case, you can see the starter cube separating from the soil because it’s so dry.

Underwatering is bad on it’s own, but it causes the most problems when young cannabis seedlings are also stressed by too high levels of nutrients, or when started in a “hot” (nutrient-enriched) soil.

When underwatering is combined with too much nutrients, seedlings often become dark green and stunted, with twisted and discolored new growth.

The solution for this (underwatering + high levels of nutrients) is simply to give the plants more water so they can establish roots and start growing again. Most plants will be able to grow out of this problem once they get enough water to start growing. While it’s not always the best idea to start out with a hot soil mix, most seedlings will easily grow into it if given a good growing environment.

This cannabis seedling is dark because it was underwatered in a “hot” soil mix, but after watering the plant as normal for a week or two, the plant started growing vigorously

3.) Nutrient Problems – leaves are yellow, discolored, crispy or have spots

Healthy cannabis leaves on seedlings should be green! Again, here’s what healthy leaves look like.. .

Healthy Leaves Look Like This

When the cannabis leaves of young plants stop being green, you need to react. Changes of color (such as yellowing, spots, burnt tips, etc) are usually a sign that there’s a problem when it comes to young cannabis plants.

The leaves of young cannabis plants & seedlings should be green!

Some common seedling nutrient problems include…

Too Much Nutrients

A nutrient toxicity is most common in dry or hot conditions, when starting in “hot” soil, and when plants are underwatered.

Two of the most common signs of nutrient toxicty are tip burn and dark leaves.

Tip burn is a sure sign that the plant took up too much nutrients

A closeup of nutrient tip burn

Nutrient burned tips eventually start curling upwards if nutrient levels are too high for too long

Very dark leaves often indicate a nitrogen toxicity (too much nitrogen)

If a nitrogen toxicity is left too long, it starts causing other nutrient problems, like the yellow lines on the bottom leaves of this plant.

Causes of Nutrient Toxicity

  • “Hot” Potting Mix – Sometimes seedlings get a nutrient toxicity when started ing a “hot” potting mix (one that has a lot of nutrients). If it’s good soil and you’re watering properly, your seedlings will be able to grow out of this relatively quickly.
  • Slow-Release Soil – Nutrient toxicities are common when grower start with a “extended release” soil like Miracle-Gro original soil – you don’t want any type of soil that will be slowly releasing nitrogen throughout the grow; it will cause nutrient burn and reduced bud development in the flowering stage. Avoid original Miracle-Gro soil and any other slow-release soils!
  • Give Nutrients Too Soon – Giving nutrients too early will overload the seedling with nutrients – in a good soil potting mix, additional nutrients usually aren’t needed for the first few weeks at least
  • Give Too Much Nutrients At Once – Giving too much nutrients at once can cause a toxicity overnight – always start at half the recommended dose according to the nutrient schedule (most cannabis nutrients come with a nutrient schedule), and see how your plants react before upping the dose

Too much nutrients too soon caused this (tip burn)

While the above seedling may look light colored, the problem is actually that it was given too high levels of nutrients.

When there’s too many nutrients, the plant can start getting light colored because some nutrients are getting locked out. The tip burn on the leaves is a good indicator that this problem is caused by too many nutrients. Also this grower started with a “hot” (nutrient rich) soil mix, and there’s no way a plant this size could have already used up all those nutrients.

A lot of growers may think the way to fix this is add more nutrients since the plant leaves are pale, but that will actually make things worse! This plant just needs some plain water until it starts to use up the nutrients in the soil, and it will soon take on a healthy green appearance on new leaves.

Not Enough or Wrong Kind of Nutrients

Nutrient deficiencies and other nutrient problems are most common when growers are using the wrong type of potting mix or cannabis nutrients.

Two of the most common signs of nutrient deficiencies are pale or yellowing leaves and other unusual leaf discoloration.

The most common type of deficiency is a nitrogen deficiency.

The yellow leaves of a nitrogen deficiency may show signs of brown, and they will usually become soft and sort of “fold” in, before turning crispy and falling off on their own.

If the yellowing leaves are at the top of your plant or the yellow leaves are mosty new growth, then you probably don’t have a nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen deficiencies affect the oldest, lowest leaves first.

Nitrogen Deficiency Leaf Closeup

There are many other nutrient deficiencies, and you can view them all here…

Causes of Nutrient Deficiencies and Problems

  • Soilless Medium w/o Hydro Nutrients – Some growers may start in a soilless medium and not realize it has no nutrients (with a soilless medium like vermiculite, coco coir, pertlie, rockwool, etc, it’s up to the grower to provide all the nutrients since they are inert mediums and don’t contain any nutrients on their own) which results in a deficiency if grower isn’t providing extra nutrients. Soilless mediums are easy to grow in, but they do require the grower provide nutrients from the beginning.
  • Don’t Provide Nutrients As Plant Uses Up Soil – Many growers start in a good soil that has nutrients, but don’t give nutrients or transplant seedlings to a bigger container when the plant has started to use up the nutrients in the soil
  • Wrong Type of Nutrients – Nutrient deficiencies commonly show up with the grower gives their plants the the wrong type of nutrients – generally it’s a good idea to give a “vegetative” nutrient formula for the first part of the plant’s life and a “bloom” nutrient formula for the flowering/budding stage. When giving the wrong time of nutrients at the wrong time, your plant won’t grow as well. If you give vegetative nutrients in the flowering stage, you make it harder for the plant to form buds, while also increasing the chance of getting nutrient burn and other nutrient problems.

Other Nutrient Problems

  • Not Maintaining pH – If growers don’t manage pH, their plants may show signs of nutrient deficiencies even if the nutrients are actually there near the roots.
  • Improper Watering Technique – Growers who don’t water properly (growing mediums stays wet or dry for too long, poor drainage, etc) often start getting nutrient deficiencies as the plant isn’t able to effectively carry out normal plant processes
  • Too Small Container – Nutrient problems crop up when plants are kept in a small container for too long without being transferred to a bigger pot (this is known as being “root bound” and can cause the plant to display nutrient deficiencies because the roots aren’t functioning properly)
  • Bugs– a lot of bugs and pests may initially look like a deficiency (spots on the leaves can appear from bites, or if bugs have infested the soil, etc)

4.) Heat – leaves bend in the middle so they look like canoes or tacos, turning up at the edges, wilting, strange spotting, symptoms usually appear after temperature starts climbing.

When the heat gets too high, the edges of the leaves will begin to curl up and the leaves will begin to “cup” or “taco.”

Here’s another cannabis seedling suffering from heat stress – notice how the edges are curling upwards. The solution to this problem is simply to lower the heat as experienced by the plant.

Sometimes the leaves sort of fold downwards due to heat, too, like this seedling

After being subjected to overwatering plus a heat wave, the leaves of the following seedling started cuppping upwards and turned lime green. The stems and veins of the leaves were turning red. You can see the soil is still dark and wet because the plant stopped drinking after developing root problems.

Cannabis plants often display heat stress when grown in hot, dry weather, especially when not given the right amount of water.

Learn more about cannabis heat stress and how to fix it: https://www.growweedeasy.com/heat-light-stress

5.) Not enough (or too much) light – burned or crinkled leaves, too much space between nodes, tall seedlings that fall over

Not Enough Light = Stretched, “Leggy,” Tall Seedlings

Too Much Light = Burned, Crinkled Leaves

Stretched, “Leggy,” Tall Seedlings – Give More Light!

This seedling is stretching too tall, with a lot of space in between sets of leaves, and a long thin stalk. This is caused by the plant not getting enough light. It’s “reaching” upwards, trying to find the sun.

More seedlings stretching from lack of light

To fix too-tall seedlings, simply provide more light (usually by bringing grow lights closer or getting a brighter grow light)

After giving enough light, growers can bury the extra stem, or just wait until the seedling grows out of it on its own

Burned, Crinkled Leaves – Reduce Light or Move Grow Lights Up

This cannabis seedling basically grew up into the grow light!

This cannabis seedling is being burned by too-close LED grow lights

FAQs – Frequently Asked Questions

Question: What do seedlings like?

Answer: Moist but not drowning conditions, warmer temps, and a bit of light to help them start growing. Very little nutrients to start.

Question: How do I avoid germination problems?

Answer: Before anyone worries about cannabis seedling problems, it’s important to get your cannabis seeds to sprout!

So make sure you are avoiding these common germination mistakes!

Most importantly, just remember that cannabis seeds like a warm, moist environment to sprout.

Common Germination problems

  • Too wet – don’t drown your seeds! While it’s okay to soak seeds for the first 24 hours, after that they should be moist but not soaking.
  • Too dry – if seeds are too dry, they won’t sprout! If seeds sprout but then are exposed to dryness, they will die.
  • Too deep – if you plant seeds too deep in the growing medium, they may have a hard time making it to the surface. An inch deep (just enough to support the seed and cover it) is about as deep as you’ll ever need to go.
  • Not warm enough – seeds and seedlings like warmer temps (from 80-85 F) and will grow more slowly in cooler environments.
  • Wrong starting growing medium – Many growers like to plant their seeds directly in a growing medium, just like in nature. But some growing mediums are better for seeds than others. Learn more about the pros and cons of different starting growing mediums here.
  • Old or improperly stored seeds – any seeds that germinates is a good seeds, but older or improperly stored seeds often take longer to sprout, and may no sprout at all, even if you do everything right.
  • Not ripe seeds (pale or translucent) – while any seed that sprouts is a good seed, seeds that are pale, flimsy or translucent have very low germination rates because they’re not fully mature.
  • Too much humidity – Some growers like to use a humidity dome for new seedlings, but don’t leaves these on too long after sprouting, as too much humidity can cause “damping off (seedling sort of folding over and dying, more info below)

Question: Am I drowning my plants? I planted my seeds two days ago in moist soil, I watered them a little, but no waterlogging. I then stopped watering them for fear of drowning them. Today, the top of the soil is getting dry, there’s still some moisture left in it, but not much from what I can tell. Should I keep it moist or just leave it be?

Answer: Young seedlings can get easily drowned, especially in a big container (learn about different containers for growing cannabis). But at the same time, they like moist conditions, and seedling roots should NEVER dry out as this can kill or seriously stunt your plant.

But how to balance the need for both water and air?

In a smaller container like a solo cup, it’s very difficult to overwater young seedlings as long as there’s plenty of drainage and you’re using a good growing medium. Once seedlings have started to outgrow a small container, you can transfer to a bigger container and the seedling will be much more robust.

If you’ve started your seedling in a big container, it’s good to be worried about overwatering young seedlings. In a large container, it generally takes a relatively long time for the growing medium to dry out, and your seedlings aren’t drinking much. Therefore it’s easy for them to get waterlogged. In this situation, you can use a spray bottle or a mister to mist the area around the plant thoroughly, which will seep down to the roots and keep them wet, but won’t soak the soil. Another option is to use just a small amount of water, maybe a cup at a time, and water in a circle around your plant until it starts growing vigorously. Giving seedlings just a bit of water at a time prevents them from getting drowned in drenched soil.

Once the plant is growing fast, you can start watering as normal (water until 20% runoff comes out the bottom, then don’t water again until the top inch is dry to the touch). At this point your plant will be drinking more and will have a stronger root system to seek out both the water and the oxygen it needs.

After reading this article, all your seedlings will look as green and happy as this one!