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growing chives in pot

How to Grow Chives in a Container

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Fresh herbs in containers put fresh flavor close at hand, and they make interesting and useful ornamentals. This tender green herb is best fresh right from the garden, so grow chives (Allium schoenoprasum) in pots on the porch or patio, or right on the kitchen windowsill so it is readily available. Chives are perennials that grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 through 9. Grow chives in a sunny spot or a partly shaded area.

For growing chives in containers, plant individual chives plants in a 6- to 8-inch diameter pot, or plant multiple plants 6 inches apart in a larger pot. Use pots that have holes in the bottom to facilitate good drainage.

Use a light, well-draining potting mix. Plant chive seedlings the same depth in the container that they were in the nursery pot. Leave 1/2 inch between the lip of the pot and the soil line to allow room for watering and fertilizer.

When growing chives indoors, place chives plants in a sunny spot where they will get at least six hours of direct sun per day. Make sure you don’t place them near a heating and/or air conditioning vent so the air won’t negatively impact the plants.

Water chives after planting until water starts to drain through the holes in the bottom of the pot, then allow the soil to dry out slightly before watering again.

When growing chives in containers, water the soil throughout the growing season when the top 1 inch of soil starts to dry out. A simple way to test the soil moisture is by inserting your finger into the soil near the edge of the pot.

Fertilize every two weeks from spring through late summer using a balanced, granular fertilizer like a 3-3-3 formula. Use 1 tablespoon. for a 6- to 8-inch diameter pot. For larger pots, between 10 and 12 inches, use 2 tablespoons. Sprinkle the fertilizer onto the soil at the base of the plant. Water after each fertilizer application to release the nutrients. Fertilizer applications vary by product; if the package label indicates a specific amount, follow the manufacturer’s guidelines.

Discontinue fertilizing chives in the winter to allow the plants to rest.

Harvest chives when they grow 6 inches tall. Cut the green leaves 2 inches above the soil line using a sharp knife or small garden clippers. Harvest chives continually through the growing season every two to thee weeks by removing the top growth when it gets 6 inches tall.

Cut off the flower when it forms to encourage more foliage growth. Chive flowers are edible and have a mild, fresh flavor.

Things You Will Need

6- to 8-inch pots

3-3-3 granular fertilizer

Knife or garden clippers

When growing chives indoors, plant several chive plants for a continued harvest. Because chive plants regrow quickly, generally two to three weeks, you can harvest one plant at a time for fresh herbs all season long.

If you want to grow organic chives, use organic potting soil and an organic fertilizer.

How to Grow Chives in a Container. Fresh herbs in containers put fresh flavor close at hand, and they make interesting and useful ornamentals. Grow chives (Allium schoenoprasum) in pots on the porch or patio, or right on the kitchen windowsill. This tender green herb is best fresh right from the garden. Chives are …

How To Grow Chives Indoors

Growing chives indoors make perfect sense so that you may have them near the kitchen. Use chives liberally in dishes; chives growing indoors will benefit from a regular trim. Keep reading to learn more about how to grow chives indoors.

How to Grow Chives Indoors

A sunny south window offers the six to eight hours of full sunlight needed when growing chives inside. Rotate pots if chives are reaching toward the light.

If a sunny window is not an option, chives growing indoors can get the necessary light from a fluorescent fixture six to twelve inches (15-30 cm.) above the pot. Two 40-watt bulbs work best when growing chives inside.

Chives growing indoors appreciate other growing pots close by to provide humidity as well as a fan for air circulation. Humidity for indoor chives may also be provided by nearby pebble trays filled with water or miniature water features nearby. Misting with a water bottle can also help prevent low humidity.

Chives growing inside should be watered when the soil is dry to the touch on the top.

Low dose fertilization is recommended for growing chives indoors. A water soluble fertilizer at half strength may be applied twice per month; heavier doses may weaken the taste of the chives.

When growing chives indoors, pests should be minimal. Often the aroma of chives acts at a pest repellent, but in the event of insect problems, spray well with soapy water. This can be applied as needed.

Tips for Planting Chives Indoors

To begin growing chives indoors, fill a 6-inch (15 cm.) clay pot with well-draining potting medium which you have pre-moistened. Soil should form a ball when squeezed, but not be soggy or dripping water. Broadcast seeds over the pre-moistened medium and cover with a fine layer of the pre-moistened soil, about ¼ inch (.6 cm.) deep. Place in the lighted area. Seeds may be kept moist until germination with a mist of water, weak plant food or weak compost tea.

Chives germinate within two weeks, often more quickly. Growing chives indoors offers a handy and easy way to season your food and brighten your space.

Growing chives indoors make perfect sense so that you may have them near the kitchen. Read this article to learn more about how to grow chives indoors so you can have easy access to the plant year round.