How Long Does It Take For Cannabis Seeds To Form

It typically takes between 3-4 months to grow weed. Let’s take a look at the question of how long does it take to grow weed and the time needed for each step. I am trying my hand at deliberately producing seeds for the first time, and have pollinated a couple of branches of my two best females with pollen from a… Weed seeds can survive in the soil for years before they germinate and grow.

How Long Does It Take To Grow Weed?

How long does it take to grow weed is a very commonly asked question. Usually it takes about 3-4 months to grow the average cannabis plant – but with the right tools and strategy, you can grow the weed plant you want in as little as 8 weeks. Let’s take a look at the question of how long does it take to grow weed and the time needed for each step.

How Long Does it Take to Grow Weed – Growing Timeline

The timeline below lays out a seven-stage process of a typical grow schedule. If you’ve been searching online for “how long does it take to grow weed?” you’ve likely run into a range of time periods. Generally, a marijuana plant can take 14 to 32 weeks to grow, which translates into about four to eight months to grow. This is for growing a marijuana plant from seed.

The length of time it takes to grow a weed plant can be broken down into multiple phases from seed to harvest:

  • Getting your equipment (1 day to 2 weeks)
  • Getting your clones or seeds (1 day to 4 weeks) (12 hours to 8 days)
  • Seedling phase (1 to 4 weeks)
  • Vegetative phase (2 weeks to 6 months)
  • Flowering phase (6 weeks to 3 months)
  • Harvesting phase (1 to 3 days)

Step 1: Getting your weed growing equipment = 1 day to 2 weeks

If you know what you are looking for then this could happen quickly. We will help you with this later on as we set up the grow-rooms and do some grows with different styles and grow mediums.

Step 2: Getting your clones or seeds = 1 day to 4 weeks

Getting clones (cuttings from healthy mother plants) is easy to do in areas that allow cannabis cultivation. But in states or countries where it is illegal to grow, obtaining healthy clones can be a challenge. Seeds, on the other hand, can be ordered on the internet and generally take 2 to 4 weeks before they arrive by mail.

Step 3: Germinate The Seeds = 12 hours to 8 days

If starting with clones this can be skipped. The average time to germinate is 2 or 3 days. Make sure to check your seeds every day because seedlings can sprout in as little as one day. You’ll know your seed has germinated when your seed has popped and displays a tap root formation.

Check out our guide on the best method to germinate marijuana seeds using paper towels and water.

Step 4: Seedling Phase = 1 week to 4 weeks

Once again, can be avoided if using clones and not seeds. As your cotyledons begin to take shape, so will your cannabis leaves in a single leaflet form. Generally, growers can give their seedling a light amount of nutrients after the third set of leaves begins to appear.

Step 5: Vegetative Phase = 2 weeks to 6 Months!

Yes, that is correct. This stage in the plants life has a huge fluctuation in how long it needs to take. You, as the grower, hold all the power and get to choose how long this phase is. Once you change the light cycle that the plant receives to 12 hours of light, and 12 hours of darkness per day, the plants will switch to the next phase, which is flowering.

If you want to, you can switch the lights to 12/12 right away and force your plants to flower! The sooner you change to 12/12, the faster your plants will flower, and the sooner you can move on to the next crop. But, keep in mind, the less amount of time you keep your plants in the vegetative phase, meaning getting at least 18 hours of light per day, the smaller your plants will be, and the less marijuana you will have to use.

If you are concerned with how big your plants will grow, maybe because you only have a small space to grow in, you can grow cannabis that only grows only a few inches tall, and you could even grow it the entire time in a little plastic cup if you wanted to!

Keep in mind that buds do not form for at least 2 to 3 weeks in the vegetative phase when beginning with seeds. Most growers allow their plants to stay in the vegetative stage from a few weeks to a few months so they get big enough and will end up with a sizable harvest. Bigger plants produce more buds!

But, many growers choose instead to grow small plants and to harvest more often with smaller yields each time. We recommend at least 3 weeks or more in the vegetative stage with at least 18+ hours of light each day for optimal yields. Even 24 hours of light per day is sometimes better, with certain strains.

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The more light, the more buds!

Keep in mind that cannabis plants usually double in size from vegetative phase to when they are done flowering. This means it’s sometimes best to change to 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness once the plants are one-half the size that you feel your grow room has adequate space for.

During the vegetative phase, you can use a number of cultivation training techniques such as super cropping, crimping, topping, tying, bending, sea of green (SOG), screen of green (SCROG), and trellising to alter the growth, direction, height, and quality of your crop.

Autoflowering strains, however, have a different vegetative time period than regular feminized seedlings. Autoflowering strains will have at least two to three weeks of vegetative growth before they automatically start showing any bud formations regardless of photoperiod.

Step 6: Flowering Phase = 6 weeks to 3 months

In nature, cannabis plants start to flower in the fall months, when they are receiving less light. The decrease in light signifies to the plants they are nearing the end of their life cycle and its time to begin flowering.

How long for seeds to develop?

I am trying my hand at deliberately producing seeds for the first time, and have pollinated a couple of branches of my two best females with pollen from a male plant that I let grow to maturity in my outdoor garden. My question is how long does it take for the seed to develop to viability? I assume that it is some fraction of the flowering period, but don’t know how much of a fraction.

The branches I picked have fully developed buds with mostly white pistils, but some are starting to turn red. I estimate I have about four to six weeks until the buds are ready to harvest. Is that long enough for the seeds to develop? I can let the pollinated branches go longer if needed.

BTW, I collected the pollen in a small paper bag, then placed the bag over the branch with the lip of the bag cinched tightly closed on the branch. I then gave the bag and branch a good shake to thoroughly disperse the pollen inside the bag. I will remove the bag in a few days.

james murphy
Well-Known Member

depends on genetics . a full 4 wks is what i roughly go by..i dont count day i look at the seed hull and the seed itself to know wen its truly ready

undercovergrow
Well-Known Member

you can remove the bag now, i’d think. i usually figure by 35-40 days, but since you probably have a lot of potential for seeds given the method you used, i’d just let her go the full flower time and give her time to finish making all the seeds. good luck on your breeding project.

nuevo
Well-Known Member

Thanks for the feedback. I will report back how the breeding projects works. Forgot to mention that the male strain is donkey kong, and the females are blue snowdog and oregon greens, all from Oregon Green Seeds. I will have to come up with some new names for the crosses if the seeds turn out. Maybe something like blue donkey dog and oregon kong.

undercovergrow
Well-Known Member

you’ll need to keep thinking on the names well, oregon kong isn’t that bad.
definitely report back and let us know how you’re project is going along. do you plan on popping your new seeds right away?

dirtpower
Well-Known Member
Tim Fox
Well-Known Member
MonkeyGrinder
Well-Known Member

There’s the paintbrush method as well for pollen.
Just let those girls go until fully mature. You’ll get those big fatty mature watermelon looking seeds. You can let the buds finish and harvest them no problem while leaving your seeded ones to get fat. You’ll only reward yourself by waiting it out if it’s needed. Also you can/should rig something up under the seeded branches to catch ones that fall out. The little bastards will pop out. Hit the floor and bounce around all over the place.

EverythingsHazy
Well-Known Member

Whatever you decide to name it, you should add “F1” to the end. It’s a good breeding practice that many other plant cultivators take very seriously. Since we don’t have any official strain naming system with the use of single and double quotes, specifying the generation if it is under f4 is good practice.

Something like: Oregon Kong (F1)

If more breeders got into this habit, over time, we could see some serious progress.

As for how long to let the seeds mature. Wait until they are dark with even darker stripes, and basically falling out on their own. If you have to pluck them out, they might not be mature, and you’ll ave wasted a perfectly good seed. You should be able to give a mature seed a firm squeeze between your thumb and index finger without it crushing. If it crushes, it probably wasn’t viable anyway.

nuevo
Well-Known Member

Whatever you decide to name it, you should add “F1” to the end. It’s a good breeding practice that many other plant cultivators take very seriously. Since we don’t have any official strain naming system with the use of single and double quotes, specifying the generation if it is under f4 is good practice.

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Something like: Oregon Kong (F1)

If more breeders got into this habit, over time, we could see some serious progress.

As for how long to let the seeds mature. Wait until they are dark with even darker stripes, and basically falling out on their own. If you have to pluck them out, they might not be mature, and you’ll ave wasted a perfectly good seed. You should be able to give a mature seed a firm squeeze between your thumb and index finger without it crushing. If it crushes, it probably wasn’t viable anyway.

Thanks for the input. Is there a guideline somewhere for seed breeders to use as far as a naming convention goes? I have been gardening for a number of years, and the names of things seems to be pretty arbitrary. I get vegetable seed catalogs every year, and haven’t noticed the use of a F1 designation. At some point, I would like to really get into the breeding aspect, as that is a part of the business that really appeals to me. I grow some pretty dank weed, and think sharing some seed stock would be a great way of passing on some of my green thumb.

EverythingsHazy
Well-Known Member

Thanks for the input. Is there a guideline somewhere for seed breeders to use as far as a naming convention goes? I have been gardening for a number of years, and the names of things seems to be pretty arbitrary. I get vegetable seed catalogs every year, and haven’t noticed the use of a F1 designation. At some point, I would like to really get into the breeding aspect, as that is a part of the business that really appeals to me. I grow some pretty dank weed, and think sharing some seed stock would be a great way of passing on some of my green thumb.

I’m not sure if there is a unified guideline, but I know at least some kinds of growers (a lot of vegetables esp.) are very finicky about labeling the generation as well as if they are “open pollinated”, which means you didn’t take measures to prevent pollen from other plants making it’s way to the seed parent. Open pollinated plants risk more variation due to possible multiple parent combos.
Some other plant growers use double quotes (“) and single quotes (‘) to designate if something is an official registered cultivar, or just somethign someone made.

As long as you have solid records, and can answer anyone who has questions about stability/lineage, you’ll be a huge step ahead of most cannabis “breeders”, including commercial ones.

DesertGrow89
Well-Known Member

Thanks for the input. Is there a guideline somewhere for seed breeders to use as far as a naming convention goes? I have been gardening for a number of years, and the names of things seems to be pretty arbitrary. I get vegetable seed catalogs every year, and haven’t noticed the use of a F1 designation. At some point, I would like to really get into the breeding aspect, as that is a part of the business that really appeals to me. I grow some pretty dank weed, and think sharing some seed stock would be a great way of passing on some of my green thumb.

Post fertilization most seeds take roughly six weeks to ripen. To test them, squeeze seeds between your fingers, if most seeds aren’t broken with firm pressure, harvest them.

jellero
Well-Known Member

i have a female charlottes web i bred with a pure afghani for pain. thinking the afghani is going to be good for muscle pain and the c. web for nerve pain. i have both.
the name may be a problem. jersey girl? jp

nuevo
Well-Known Member

First check of seed condition. The first pic shows the seeds and flower from the first bud trimmed off about two weeks ago. Second pic is buds trimmed a couple of days ago. Seeds from first bud not mature and unlikely to be viable. Will check second set of buds in two weeks. Will be getting a lot of seeds in the end because two entire plants were pollinated, not just the two branches I dusted. If anyone would like to have some viable seeds cheap, send me a pm. If in the Portland area, will share some bud too.

nuevo
Well-Known Member

The naming of this new local strain is based on the travails of an unsecured outdoor grow that was forced indoors. The momma and daddy plants started as seeds, and were transplanted outdoors after germing indoors until about mid May, after a week or so of 12/12 lighting to picks out the girls. I didn’t intend to transplant any boys, but one got through my inspection.

They were growing with great vigor when they got hacked by some immature pot thieves. With apparently no experience for how these special ladies were destined to grow into very special plants, they climbed into my back yard and into my garden. I had a little grouping of rocket chunk girls just starting to bud out nicely with lots of trikes, and my unwelcome visitors topped all three along with a few of the best branch tips.

I had four other plants outside that didn’t get hit that first night, and I immediately potted up the three smaller girls into 5 gallon plastic pots, and proceeded to start moving the pots into the house at night, very much a literal pain in the ass. The largest plant was too big for a pot, so it got left in the ground. It turned out to be the daddy plant.

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I was able to keep a pretty good routine moving the plants, in the house at night and out in the sunshine every morning. As those of you in the northwest know, we got plenty of sunshiny days this summer..

Unfortunately, my nemesis returned one night when I forgot to move the plants inside.

nuevo
Well-Known Member

I missed moving the plants one night, and the creeper came back around and topped two of the three potted plants, and broke off several branch tips of still immature flowers. A few night later I forgot again and got hit. Finally, I got into the daily habit of never missing putting the pots in at night, but all three plants lost their tops and nearly all of their branch tips to the Creepers. I was left with three pretty good size plants still though, but highly stressed by now. All three plants started shedding sugar and fan leaves leaves, but the buds were growing up to be pretty good, firm little nuggets all over every branch.

About this time, the only plant left in the ground was growing into a massive male plant, standing over eight feet tall with a main trunk about two inches in diameter. This is the plant I used to dust the ladies. There was so many pollen sacs that when I finally cut the daddy plant completely down, the ground below was covered in a yellow dust. Since I was putting the potted plants outside each morning, I am guessing that pollen blown from the daddy plant ended up pollinating the entire plants, not just the branches I had dusted earlier..

Now I have two true mommas with lots of pretty buds swelling up with seeds. If I am able to finish these beauties with good, viable seeds, I will have seeds of two different crosses. I am predicting good results from my little breeding project, and soon there will be two new strains from the west end of the gorge.

The daddy plant was blue snow dog, and the mommies are donkey kong and oregon greens.

The blue dog x oregon green is hearby named Hackleberry Creep (F1). It will sneak up and hit you in the head, leaving a hole where your brains leak out.

The blue dog x donkey kong cross will be known as Daddy Donkey Dog (F1), or 3D for short. 3D will cause mind bending semi-hallucinatory visions with a little deep thinking on the side. Best used with some Pink Floyd or Rush.

How long do weed seeds survive in the soil?

CORVALLIS – Weed seeds can survive in the soil for years before they germinate and grow, according to Jed Colquhoun, weed specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

Why should home gardeners care?

“If you combine the longevity of seeds in the soil with the fact that weeds such as common lambsquarters can produce over 500,000 seeds per plant, the incentive to hand weed your garden becomes much greater,” said Colquhoun.

“Prevention is the most effective form of weed control,” he said.

Here are some basics on weed seed biology:

Undisturbed weed seeds tend to persist longer than seeds subjected to periodic tillage. Weed seeds in deeply worked soil tend to last longer than seeds in shallowly worked soil. Seeds deep in the soil are “stored” below the germination zone.

Grass seeds tend to be less persistent than broadleaf weed seeds.

The number of surviving seeds of most weed species declines rapidly the first year. But thereafter the rate of weed seed decline slows. Some seeds can persist for decades.

As many as 130 million seeds per plow acre were found in a Minnesota study.

Different species of weeds have seeds that last varying numbers of years in the soil. The scientific literature provides some information about seed longevity, including:

  • Brome grass seed seldom lasts more than two years.
  • Annual ryegrass – up to nine years.
  • Perennial ryegrass – up to three years.
  • Annual bluegrass – up to about five years.
  • Wild oats – three to six years, but longer in deep soil.
  • Jointed goatgrass – three to five-and-a-half years.
  • Barnyardgrass – up to 13 years.
  • Quackgrass – up to four years.
  • Common velvetgrass – 10 years or more.
  • Mustards – are long lived. Seeds excavated from a monastery in Denmark were dated to be 600 years old and 11 of them germinated. More commonly, mustard seeds last for decades.
  • Lambsquarters – may last up to four decades.
  • Russian thistle (tumbleweed) – short lived, most live only a year.
  • Wild carrot – several years.
  • Curly dock – more than a decade.
  • Canada thistle – more than two decades.
  • Field bindweed – more than 50 years.
  • Leafy spurge – at least a few years.
  • Common groundsel – most die within a year.

Scientists found lotus seeds in Manchuria that germinated after over 1,000 years, said Colquhoun.