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Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine

Affiliations

  • 1 Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas (Área de Microbiología), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz, Spain.
  • 2 Estación Enológica, Junta de Extremadura, 06200, Almendralejo, Spain.
  • 3 Heral Enología, SL, C/Alfonso Iglesias Infante n(o) 11, 06200, Almendralejo, Spain.
  • 4 Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas (Área de Microbiología), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • PMID: 27375256
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2016.06.006

Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine

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Authors

Affiliations

  • 1 Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas (Área de Microbiología), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz, Spain.
  • 2 Estación Enológica, Junta de Extremadura, 06200, Almendralejo, Spain.
  • 3 Heral Enología, SL, C/Alfonso Iglesias Infante n(o) 11, 06200, Almendralejo, Spain.
  • 4 Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas (Área de Microbiología), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • PMID: 27375256
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2016.06.006

Abstract

The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine’s foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine.

Keywords: Autolysis; Diethyl succinate (PubChem CID: 31249); Foam; Killer; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Sparkling wine; Yeast; diethyl malate (PubChem CID: 24197); ethyl 2-methylbutanoate (PubChem CID: 24020); ethyl 4-hydroxybutanoate (PubChem CID: 357772); ethyl octanoate (PubChem CID: 7799); octanoic acid (PubChem CID: 379); γ-butyrolactone (PubChem CID: 7302).

Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties a …

Influence of killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on wine fermentation

Affiliation

  • 1 Departamento de Microbiología, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.
  • PMID: 11816985
  • DOI: 10.1023/a:1012034608908

Influence of killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on wine fermentation

  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 Departamento de Microbiología, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.
  • PMID: 11816985
  • DOI: 10.1023/a:1012034608908

Abstract

The effect of killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth of sensitive strains during must fermentation was studied by using a new method to monitor yeast populations. The capability of killer yeast strains to eliminate sensitive strains depends on the initial proportion of killer yeasts, the susceptibility of sensitive strains, and the treatment of the must. In sterile filtered must, an initial proportion of 2-6% of killer yeasts was responsible for protracted fermentation and suppression of isogenic sensitive strains. A more variable initial proportion was needed to get the same effect with non-isogenic strains. The suspended solids that remain in the must after cold-settling decreased killer toxin effect. The addition of bentonite to the must avoided protracted fermentation and the suppression of sensitive strains; however, the addition of yeast dietary nutrients with yeast cell walls did not, although it decreased fermentation lag.

The effect of killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth of sensitive strains during must fermentation was studied by using a new method to monitor yeast populations. The capability of killer yeast strains to eliminate sensitive strains depends on the initial proportion of killer yeast …