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leonotis leonurus seeds

Wild Dagga / Lion’s Tail

Wild Dagga, or Lion’s Tail (Leonotis leonurus) is perennial shrub native to the Southern parts of Africa and has found a home in a number of gardens with moderate winters. Plants produce showy, bright orange flowers attractive to hummingbirds and a host of other beneficial insects. Wild Dagga’s low fertility and water requirements – consider it drought tolerant after its first year of establishment – make it an ideal plant for xeriscaping setups. Mature plants in flower can reach well over five feet tall.

Perennial plants require a year of growth prior to flowering. Plants can be grown in colder winter climates but must be brought indoors and overwintered.

Wild Dagga, or Lion's Tail (Leonotis leonurus) is perennial shrub native to the Southern parts of Africa and has found a home in a number of gardens with moderate winters. Plants produce showy, bright orange flowers attractive to hummingbirds and a host of other beneficial insects. Wild Dagga's low fertility and water

Leonotis leonurus – Indigenous South African Shrub – 10 Seeds

Leonotis leonurus is commonly known as wild dagga. It is a robust shrub which grows up to 2-3m tall and 1.5m wide. It is common and widespread throughout South Africa and grows amongst rocks in grassland. Stems are velvety and woody at the base. The leaves are long, narrow, rough above, velvety below, with serrate edges. The wild dagga flowers profusely in autumn with its characteristic bright orange flowers carried in compact clusters in whorls along the flower stalk. Apricot and creamy white flowered forms are also found. This is an excellent plant for attracting wildlife to your garden as the flowers profuse copious nectar which attracts birds, bees and butterflies. The wild dagga is fast growing and is frost hardy. It should be well watered in summer but does not require much water in the winter months. It is very easy to grow but will do best in well drained loamy soils with plenty of compost added. Plants should be cut right back at the end of winter. Propagate from seed, cuttings or by dividing up large clumps. The wild dagga is widely used in traditional medicine to treat fevers, headaches, coughs, dysentery and many other conditions. It is also used as a remedy for snake bite and as a charm to keep snakes away.

Leonotis leonurus is commonly known as wild dagga. It is a robust shrub which grows up to 2-3m tall and 1.5m wide. It is common and widespread throughout South Africa and grows amongst rocks in grassland. Stems are velvety and woody at the base. The leaves are long, narrow, rough above, velvety below, with serrate ed