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Chia (Salvia hispanica): A Review of Native Mexican Seed and its Nutritional and Functional Properties

Affiliations

  • 1 Departamento de Alimentos y Biotecnología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico city, Mexico. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Departamento de Alimentos y Biotecnología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico city, Mexico.
  • PMID: 26319904
  • DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2015.06.002

Chia (Salvia hispanica): A Review of Native Mexican Seed and its Nutritional and Functional Properties

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Authors

Affiliations

  • 1 Departamento de Alimentos y Biotecnología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico city, Mexico. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Departamento de Alimentos y Biotecnología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico city, Mexico.
  • PMID: 26319904
  • DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2015.06.002

Abstract

In this chapter, a review is made on various aspects of chia seed in order to provide an overall, yet comprehensive view, about this important commodity with the aim of updating the current state of knowledge on its composition, possible nutraceutical properties, and potential benefits for human health. Based on this approach, the discussion includes some comments on the main historical aspects, morphology of the seed, its importance in the diet of humans and stresses the main results issued from investigations on its three main components; lipid, protein, and fiber. The chapter closes with a discussion on the potential benefits for human health, highlighting the contradictions that still exist in this area and the need for continued research in this direction and considerations on the role of chia seed as a functional food.

Keywords: Antioxidants; Chia seed; Functional food; Health benefits; Salvia hispanica.

In this chapter, a review is made on various aspects of chia seed in order to provide an overall, yet comprehensive view, about this important commodity with the aim of updating the current state of knowledge on its composition, possible nutraceutical properties, and potential benefits for human hea …

Mexican Annual Teosinte

Zea mays parvaglumis. An annual teosinte species that grows wild from Nayarit to Oaxaca. This is the subspecies of teosinte that was first domesticated in the Balsas River Valley 9,000 years ago. As domesticated corn spread throughout the Mesoamerica, it received some genetic material from other teosinte subspecies such as Zea mays mexicana in Northwest Mexico.

This wild ancestor to domesticated corn shares many of the same traits as modern corn. However, the ears are small (2-3″) with only 1 row of triangular shaped seeds. Plants will produce silks and tassels, but will be bushier with many branches. Each seed is enclosed by a very hard fruitcase that protects it in the wild. Soak seeds overnight to aid in germination. Native to Mexico, wild Zea species are shortening-day plants meaning that flowering is triggered as the days shorten. Not from our Seed Bank Collection, but your purchase supports our conservation mission.

  • Approx. 3g/50 seeds per packet.
  • Not suitable for northern climates due to day-length sensitivity.

Zea mays parvaglumis. An annual teosinte species that grows wild from Nayarit to Oaxaca. This is the subspecies of teosinte that was first domesticated in the Balsas River Valley 9,000 years ago. As domesticated corn spread throughout the Mesoamerica, it received some genetic material from other teosinte subspecies suc