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Watering Morning Glories: How Much Water Do Morning Glories Need

Bright, cheerful morning glories (Ipomoea spp.) are annual vines that will fill your sunny wall or fence with heart-shaped leaves and trumpet-shaped flowers. Easy care and fast growing, morning glories offer a sea of blossoms in pink, purple, red, blue, and white. Like most other summer annuals, they need water to thrive. Read on for information about morning glory watering needs.

Morning Glory Watering Needs – Germination

Morning glory watering needs are different in the varying stages of their lives. If you want to plant morning glory seeds, you’ll need to soak them for 24 hours before planting. Soaking loosens the hard outer coat of the seed and encourages germination.

Once you’ve planted the seeds, keep the soil surface consistently moist until the seeds sprout. Watering morning glories at this stage is critical. If the soil dries out, the seeds will probably die. Expect the seeds to germinate in about a week.

How Much Water Do Morning Glories Need as Seedlings?

Once the morning glory seeds become seedlings, you need to continue offering them irrigation. How much water do morning glories need at this stage? You should water seedlings several times a week or whenever the soil surface feels dry.

It is important to meet the morning glory watering needs when they are seedlings to help them develop strong root systems. Ideally, water in the early morning or in the evening to prevent evaporation.

When to Water Morning Glory Plants Once Established

Once morning glory vines are established, they require less water. The plants will grow in dry soil, but you’ll want to keep watering morning glories to keep the top inch (2.5 cm.) of soil moist. This encourages steady growth and generous amounts of blossoms. A 2-inch (5 cm.) layer of organic mulch helps keep in water and discourage weeds. Keep mulch a few inches (7.5 to 13 cm.) from the foliage.

With established plants, it is hard to give a precise answer to the question: “How much water do morning glories need?”. When to water morning glory plants depends on whether you are growing them inside or outside. Indoor plants need a weekly drink, while outside, morning glory watering needs depend on rainfall. During dry spells, you may need to water your outdoor morning glories every week.

Easy care and fast growing, morning glories offer a sea of blossoms in pink, purple, red, blue and white. Like most other summer annuals, they need water to thrive. Click here for information about morning glory watering needs.

Instructions for Planting Morning Glory Seeds

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The large purple blooms of the morning glory vine (Ipomoea purpurea) open in the morning and each bloom only survives for one day, but the plant continues to produce new buds and flower all summer. The plant grows readily from seed sown indoors or out. It grows as an annual in all climates, but it readily self-seeds once established so you might only need to plant it once.

Site Preparation

Morning glories need at least six hours of direct sun each day to flower at their best. Rich soil that maintains moisture without becoming soggy results in the healthiest growth, so amend the soil with 2 inches of compost before you plant and select a site that isn’t prone to standing water. A morning glory vine can grow up to 10 feet tall and requires a support for it to twine around. A garden trellis, sturdy twine attached to a fence or a railing provides support and should be installed before you plant the seeds.

Seed Preparation

Each seed has a hard seed coat that can delay germination. Preparing the seeds before you plant softens the seed coat and speeds germination, increasing the number of seeds that sprout successfully. Rubbing one end of each seed gently with a metal file until the inner seed coating is just visible allows the seed to soak up water and sprout more quickly. Further speed the process by soaking the scuffed seeds in a bowl of warm water overnight the day before you sow them.

Planting

The plants can’t tolerate frost, so you must wait until all danger of spring frost has passed before sowing them outdoors. You can start the seeds indoors about six weeks before the last expected frost. If you plant indoors, use biodegradeable peat pots, which you can plant in the ground where they quickly break down, minimizing root disturbance. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep, either one per pot or spaced 12 inches apart in the garden bed along the base of the support. Keeping the top 6 inches of soil moist ensures germination. Morning glory seeds usually sprout within a week.

Early Care

Once the seeds sprout they put on rapid growth. Morning glory vines don’t require tying to the support to climb, but you might need to guide the first shoots onto the support so they can grip it. The plants need about 1 inch of water weekly from rain or irrigation, or enough so the top 6 inches of soil remains moderately moist. Covering the bed with a 2-inch layer of mulch after the plants begin to climb helps retain moisture. Morning glories don’t require fertilization or pruning, but you can pinch back the growing tips of each vine once they reach the top of the trellis to prevent further upward growth.

  • Missouri Botanical Garden: Ipomoea Purpurea
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension: Morning Glory

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington’s specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

Instructions for Planting Morning Glory Seeds. The large purple blooms of the morning glory vine (Ipomoea purpurea) open in the morning and each bloom only survives for one day, but the plant continues to produce new buds and flower all summer. The plant grows readily from seed sown indoors or out. It grows as an …