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How to Plant Seeds From Tulip Pods

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Planting tulip (Tulipa) seeds is a laborious process and won’t yield a flower for at least seven years, as the majority of tulips are grown from bulbs. However, if you have patience and just want to experiment, plant the seeds from the tulip pods and wait for the bulb to develop.

Tulips are cold-weather flowers and produce colorful displays in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 4 to 10, with each zone having different in-ground planting months. The National Gardening Association gives a good layout for when to plant in which zone; however, growing from seeds is more an indoor task for at least one year.

History of the Prized Tulip

Originally grown wild in the Chinese region that borders Tibet, Afghanistan and Russia, tulips traveled the Silk Road and arrived in Istanbul by early 1055, as noted in Smithsonian Magazine. By the 15th century, the Ottoman Empire’s sultan had so many tulips growing in his gardens that he required 920 gardeners to tend them, and today the tulip is the symbol of the Ottomans. The tulips of Holland are the most famous because of its ideal growing conditions.

Tulips like mild winters and summers that are not too hot. The maritime conditions of North Sea Holland are just right, as the temperatures provide the right range during the bulbs’ growing season, and the proximity of water allows the tulip bulbs to convert the starch inside the bulb into sugar, thus giving it energy. The average annual temperature in these coastal areas is 48 degrees Fahrenheit, creating the ideal climate for the tulips, reports Tulip Festival Amsterdam.

Planting Seeds From Tulip Pods

Once your tulip plant has flowered, allow it to dry out and wither. When the pods turn brown, remove them from the plant. Open the pods and remove the seeds and place them in a dish for about a week to dry out. Then move the seeds to a plastic bag surrounded by a damp paper towel. Keep the bag in the refrigerator for several months, creating a dormancy period prior to planting the seeds.

Remove the seeds from the bag and plant in individual small pots filled with well-draining compost. The Garden of Eaden recommends topping off the seed with no more than about 1/2 inch (1 centimeter) of soil and setting the pots out in the sun or a south-facing cold-frame (think incubation box). It may take several months to a year for the seeds to germinate in temperatures that range from 65 to 75 degrees F. Be sure to keep the pots watered and add a dose of slow-release liquid fertilizer. When the seeds have grown at least two leaves, they are ready to move to the garden.

Moving Seedlings Outdoors

Once the seedlings have matured to the point where they can grow outdoors in the ground, they can be gently transplanted. The process to this maturity takes anywhere from 12 to 15 months. The root systems of the seeds are delicate and must be handled with care. Touch the new bulb and be sure it’s brown and firm; plant the young bulbs in the autumn.

Check your hardiness zone to be sure that the newly planted bulbs are exposed to cold weather over the winter. Bulbs meant for zones 8 through 10 may need additional refrigeration before planting into ground. Don’t plant the bulbs unless the ground is under 60 degrees F. The big surprise is when the tulips flower – and what comes up is not at all like the plant from which you harvested the seeds. Some tulips are hybrids, as opposed to specific species varieties, so get ready to be surprised.

  • Smithsonian Magazine: There Never Was a Real Tulip Fever
  • The National Gardening Association: Planting Tulips
  • Tulip Festival Amsterdam: Why Do Tulips Grow So Well in Holland?
  • The Garden of Eaden: How to Grow Species Tulips from Seed

A versatile writer, Jann enjoys research as well as doing the actual writing. A career in television writing, as a magazine editor and celebrity interviewer, Jann adapts to her environment, having traveled the world, living overseas and packing and unpacking her treasures for a new location over 30 times.

How to Plant Seeds From Tulip Pods. Tulips (Tulipa spp.) are most often grown from bulbs, though they can also be started from seed. The process of starting them from seeds is a long one, and the tulips will not bloom for four to six years from the time they are sown. When collected from hybrid tulips, the seeds will …

How to Plant Tulip Seeds

By: Diane Dilov-Schultheis

21 September, 2017

If you have a large cold-storage unit, you can use an optional way to cold-treat tulip seeds for germination. Instead of putting seeds in the refrigerator (as in Step 1), place seed trays covered with plastic in cold storage for three weeks. Place trays outside in a shady area, keep damp and cover with glass. Transplant to a permanent location when seedlings have a second leaf.

Tulips provide big, beautiful blossoms that resemble upside-down bells in a large assortment of striking colors. Typically grown from bulbs, tulip seeds work as a means to grow tulips also. Plants grown this way may not produce any blooms for five to seven years following planting. Provide the appropriate conditions, use the proper methods to plant tulip seeds and benefit from watching this little seed germinate, grow and flourish into a mature tulip plant.

Place the seeds in a small plastic bag with wet vermiculite. Put the bag in vegetable crisper of your refrigerator for three months prior to planting. This helps in the tulip seeds’ germination process.

  • Tulips provide big, beautiful blossoms that resemble upside-down bells in a large assortment of striking colors.
  • Provide the appropriate conditions, use the proper methods to plant tulip seeds and benefit from watching this little seed germinate, grow and flourish into a mature tulip plant.

Use a hand trowel and healthy soil to fill starter trays or pots. Use a gloved finger to make a hole about ¼ of an inch deep.

Space the tulip seeds at least ½ of an inch apart. Place one seed in each hole.

Use your hand or the trowel to cover the seed loosely with soil. Completely cover the seed and hole, but do not pack it tightly.

Supply water to the planted tulip seeds to keep the soil damp at all times. Utilize lukewarm water for watering.

  • Use a hand trowel and healthy soil to fill starter trays or pots.
  • Use your hand or the trowel to cover the seed loosely with soil.

Continue to water until seedlings appear. Increase the quantity of sun the plants get until full sun is supplied.

Do not transplant tulip seedlings to their permanent location until they are strong enough. Look for a second leaf to appear on the stem first.

Tulips provide big, beautiful blossoms that resemble upside-down bells in a large assortment of striking colors. Typically grown from bulbs, tulip seeds work as a means to grow tulips also. Plants grown this way may not produce any blooms for five to seven years following planting. Provide the appropriate conditions, …